I hope this is not too long...

[woordvolgorde]
According to many, the word order is one of the hardest parts of the Dutch language. If you are also struggling with subordinate clauses, inversion and the like, this is the place to be.
Post Reply
Cgull
Lid
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 10:56 am
Country of residence: Australia
Mother tongue: English
Gender: Female

I hope this is not too long...

Post by Cgull » Mon Sep 28, 2015 12:10 pm

Hi. I am trying to stay two steps ahead of my children as we learn Dutch together.

We have been slowly moving along, and we are listening to a story I found called "De Eerste Put" (on a website called Bookbox which has many folk tales in many languages with subtitles in English and the other language - it's meant for English learning but it works both ways!)
Anyway, I've been reading about a technique called TPRStorytelling and I want to try making our own stories based on De Eerste Put and using lots of "circling" questions to practice the phrases. So I need to know my questions and changes to the sentences aren't wrong. Can you tell me any errors in the following please? (the idea is to get the kids to decide the answers to the questions, or offer their own ideas)...
My basic story, using phrases from the first part of de Eerste Put, is

Er was eens een park dat tussen de bossen lag. In het park stond een waterval. Op een dag, de waterval droogde op. Die arme dieren! De waterval droogde op! De dieren zochten hoog en laag. De vossen zochten naar boven de waterval. Naar boven de waterval vonden de vossen een steen. De dieren alle duwde de steen en de waterval liep meer.


For each phrase, I need to ask the kids for individual details (so it will be a different story we make) and then "circle" with lots of questions so they hear the phrases over and over and to check they understand. These are the questions I have thought of:

Er was eens een plaats. Wat was de plaats? Was de plaats een boerderij/stad/park?

Was er een boerderij of een park? nij, er was niet een boerderij, er was een park.(can/should I say "er was een boerderij niet"?)
Waar lag het park? Naast een rivier? rond een berg? op een berg? onder een berg? tussen de bossen? nij, het park lag niet naast een rivier! ja, dat is correct, het park tussen de bossen lag. (can I say "het park lag tussen de bossen"?)

Liep het park tussen de bossen? nij, het park tussen de bossen niet liep, dat is belachelijk! het park tussen de bossen lag. Sprong het park...? etc... wat heeft het park doen tussen de bossen? het park tussen de bossen lag. Heeft het park tussen de bossen lag of sprong?

Stond een waterval in de stad? Stond de waterval in het park of op een berg? ja, jij bent heel intelligent. De waterval in het park stond. Lag de waterval in het park? Sprong de waterval in het park? wat heeft de waterval in het park doen?

Droogde op de rivier/bomen/gras?

Wie zoekte naar boven de waterval? Zoechten de katten...? Zochten de walvissen...? Zochten zij naar onder de waterval of naar boven de waterval?

Vonden ze een boem of een steen? Wat vonden ze? Waar vonden ze de steen? Vonden de vossen de steen naar boven de waterval of naar onder de waterval?


I hope it is not asking too much for someone to look over these and tell me how I'm going.

Dank jullie wel,

Claire

ngonyama
Superlid
Posts: 1299
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 12:15 am
Country of residence: United States
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English
Third language: German
Fourth language: French
Fifth, sixth, seventh, ..., languages: Russisch, Xhosa

Re: I hope this is not too long...

Post by ngonyama » Mon Sep 28, 2015 5:44 pm

Cgull wrote:Hi. I am trying to stay two steps ahead of my children as we learn Dutch together.

We have been slowly moving along, and we are listening to a story I found called "De Eerste Put" (on a website called Bookbox which has many folk tales in many languages with subtitles in English and the other language - it's meant for English learning but it works both ways!)
Anyway, I've been reading about a technique called TPRStorytelling and I want to try making our own stories based on De Eerste Put and using lots of "circling" questions to practice the phrases. So I need to know my questions and changes to the sentences aren't wrong. Can you tell me any errors in the following please? (the idea is to get the kids to decide the answers to the questions, or offer their own ideas)...
My basic story, using phrases from the first part of de Eerste Put, is

Er was eens een park dat tussen de bossen lag. In het park stond hmm, is it frozen that it stands still? stroomde would be more antural here een waterval. Op een dag, de waterval droogde de waterval op. Die arme dieren! De waterval droogde op! De dieren zochten hoog en laag. De vossen zochten naar boven de waterval. Naar bovenStroomopwaarts van de waterval vonden de vossen een grote steen. Al de De dieren alle duwden de steen uit de weg en de waterval liep meerweer.


For each phrase, I need to ask the kids for individual details (so it will be a different story we make) and then "circle" with lots of questions so they hear the phrases over and over and to check they understand. These are the questions I have thought of:

Er was eens een plaats. Wat was dehet voor plaats? Was de plaats een boerderij/stad/park?

Was erhet een boerderij of een park? nijNee, erhet was niet eengeen boerderij, erHet was een park.(can/should I say "er was een boerderij niet"? No, for indefinite nouns use "geen")
Waar lag het park? Naast een rivier? rond een berg? op een berg? onder een berg? tussen de bossen? nij, het park lag niet naast een rivier! ja, dat is correct, het park tussen de bossen lag. (can I say "het park lag tussen de bossen"? you must; the other word order occurs after conjunctions like omdat, hoewel or relative pronouns like die, dat. E.g. Dat was zo omdat het park tussen de bossen lag.)

Liep het park tussen de bossen? nij, het park liep niet tussen de bossen niet liep, dat is belachelijk! Actually it is not all that ridiculous if you add "door": Het park liep tussen de bossen door: The park extended all the way through the forests. het park tussen de bossen lag. Sprong het park...? etc... wat heeft het park doen tussen de bossen?I do not understand this. Maybe Wat doet dat park daar tussen de bossen? het park tussen de bossen lag. Heeft het park tussen de bossen lag of sprong? Depending on what they already know you might want to use totally ridiculous verbs here like "eten" or "dromen". "slapen", "fietsen", "rijden".

Stond een waterval in de stad? Since waterval is indefinite this phrase needs "er": Was er een waterval in de stad? Stond de waterval in het park of op een berg? ja, jij bent heel intelligentbij kinderen eerder: "slim". De waterval in het park stond. Lag de waterval in het park? Sprong de waterval in het park? wat heeft de waterval in het park doen?

Droogde op de rivier/bomen/gras op? The separable adverb moves to the end. Notice also that for bomen the verb becomes droogdeN.

Wie zoektezocht compare English: seek - sought naar boven de waterval? Zoechten de katten...? Zochten de walvissen...? Zochten zij naar onder de waterval of naar boven de waterval?

Vonden ze een boemboom of een steen? Wat vonden ze? Waar vonden ze de steen? Vonden de vossen de steen naar boven de waterval of naar onder de waterval?


I hope it is not asking too much for someone to look over these and tell me how I'm going.

Nope, this is not too much at all! You are doing pretty well and I admire your courage at being a teacher and a learner simultaneously. That is a tough thing to do. I'll gladly be of help.

Notice that "er" is similar to English "there" and "het" to "it", although admittedly a lot more could be said about "er" that does not have a clear equivalent in English.

Er was een plaats (or: plek is probably better with children)- There was a place.
Het was een park - It was a park.

Another remark is that parks with waterfalls are rather rare in the Netherlands, it being a rather flat country. So our terminology for above and below a waterfall is kind of cumbersome. We don't use it much. Also we don't have many stones that could block streams: "een steen" is more something that fits in your hand. What you mean is more commonly called "een rotsblok" or at least "een grote steen".

Notice that word order is a royal pain in Dutch, but it is probably a good idea to start with short sentences and do them right. The word order errors are marked in red.




Dank jullie wel,

Claire

Cgull
Lid
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 10:56 am
Country of residence: Australia
Mother tongue: English
Gender: Female

Re: I hope this is not too long...

Post by Cgull » Tue Sep 29, 2015 4:31 am

Dank u, dank u!

Cgull
Lid
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 10:56 am
Country of residence: Australia
Mother tongue: English
Gender: Female

Re: I hope this is not too long...

Post by Cgull » Wed Sep 30, 2015 12:47 pm

Thank you again! Checking my understanding...

Is this better:

Stroomde de waterval in een stad? Stroomde de waterval in een park of op een berg? De waterval stroomde in het park. Lag de waterval in het park? Sprong de waterval in het park? Wat doet dat waterval in het park?

Vonden ze een grote boom of een grote steen? Wat vonden ze? Waar vonden ze de steen? Vonden de vossen de steen boven de waterval of onder de waterval?

Or should I be saying "Vonden ze de steen stroomopwards van de waterval"?

hmmm, I probably need to change my story if it is using too many rare words. I wanted to make it simple. I will have to think about it more.

Also, in the original story (de eerste put) we have the sentence, "Tijdens een heel hete zomer, regende het niet en het meer droogde op." Can you explain why I can't say "Op een dag, de waterval droogde op"? I don't understand the difference.

Thank you again for your time!

ngonyama
Superlid
Posts: 1299
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 12:15 am
Country of residence: United States
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English
Third language: German
Fourth language: French
Fifth, sixth, seventh, ..., languages: Russisch, Xhosa

Re: I hope this is not too long...

Post by ngonyama » Wed Sep 30, 2015 2:49 pm

Cgull wrote:Thank you again! Checking my understanding...

Is this better:

Stroomde de waterval in een stad? Stroomde de waterval in een park of op een berg? De waterval stroomde in het park. Lag de waterval in het park? Sprong de waterval in het park? Wat doet datdie waterval in het park?

More natural would be:

Bevond de waterval zich in de stad? Bevond de waterval zich in een park of op een berg?

You can also just use "to be"

Waar was de waterval? Was de waterval in de stad? Etc.

For something static like a house or a tree "stond" would be a good alternative

Waar stonden die bomen? Stonden ze naast de waterval of in de stad?


Vonden ze een grote boom of een grote steen? Wat vonden ze? Waar vonden ze de steen? Vonden de vossen de steen boven de waterval of onder de waterval?

Or should I be saying "Vonden ze de steen stroomopwards van de waterval"? onder and boven will do I think, although "beneden" is a little better than "onder"

hmmm, I probably need to change my story if it is using too many rare words. I wanted to make it simple. I will have to think about it more.

Also, in the original story (de eerste put) we have the sentence, "Tijdens een heel hete zomer, regende het niet en het meer droogde op." Can you explain why I can't say "Op een dag, de waterval droogde op"? I don't understand the difference.

When you put an adverbial expression like "op een dag"at the front of the sentence you get inversion: the finite verb and the subject swap places like they do in a question:

De waterval droogde op een dag op.
Op een dag droogde de waterval op.

Compare:
De waterval droogde op.
Droogde de waterval op?

Notice that the prepositional adverb "op" of the separable verb "opdrogen" always moves to the end.
Notice also that there is no comma after "Op een dag". It matters, because if you do have a comma like after "yes", you do not get inversion:

Ja, de waterval droogde op.

Please don't confuse inversion with what happens in dependent clauses where all of the verb moves to the end. That is a different phenomenon Separables then reunite. E.g.:

Ik zei dat de waterval opdroogde.


Thank you again for your time!

Cgull
Lid
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 10:56 am
Country of residence: Australia
Mother tongue: English
Gender: Female

Re: I hope this is not too long...

Post by Cgull » Thu Oct 01, 2015 6:55 am

Dank u.

So, "tijdens een heel hete zomer, regende het niet..." - we have the inversion there, yes? (even though it does have a comma - I went back and checked - ) "...en het meer drogde op." - so this goes back to normal because it comes after "regende het niet" - only one phrase gets inverted? ... or is "tijdens een heel hete zomer" not an adverbial expression? I'm beginning to really feel my lack of grammar knowledge! I didn't realise how little I know!
You can also just use "to be"

Waar was de waterval? Was de waterval in de stad? Etc.

For something static like a house or a tree "stond" would be a good alternative

Waar stonden die bomen? Stonden ze naast de waterval of in de stad?
This is good to know. I wasn't sure if I could just use 'to be', as it seems like the Dutch use 'to be' a lot less than we do (I'm going to start listening now to see if this loss is common across all English speakers or just Australians). It is actually hard for me to guess what a waterfall might be doing. In my mind, it can stand, as the waterfall itself doesn't move to different parts of the stream, but I guess that's one of those subtle differences in the way different languages think, or the exact meaning of stond vs stood... or whether one considers the cliff behind to be part of the waterfall... I suppose the waterfall can fall...? Anyway, I really think I should think of something else entirely and change my story to avoid words like stroomopwards.

I'm beginning to think I should just forget this storyasking thing altogether, but I have to start somewhere with learning Dutch word order and nothing else so far seems to work for me either...

ngonyama
Superlid
Posts: 1299
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 12:15 am
Country of residence: United States
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English
Third language: German
Fourth language: French
Fifth, sixth, seventh, ..., languages: Russisch, Xhosa

Re: I hope this is not too long...

Post by ngonyama » Thu Oct 01, 2015 4:44 pm

Cgull wrote:Dank u.

So, "tijdens een heel hete zomer, regende het niet..." - we have the inversion there, yes? (even though it does have a comma - I went back and checked - )
:? The sentence should be "Tijdens een heel hete zomer regende het niet" without comma. Unless you have something like: Soms, zoals tijdens een heel hete zomer, regende het niet. But the the "soms" part still triggers inversion



"...en het meer droogde op." - so this goes back to normal because it comes after "regende het niet" - only one phrase gets inverted?
The conjunction "en" (and) starts off a new sentence in this case.

... or is "tijdens een heel hete zomer" not an adverbial expression?
No it is: it is an expression of time, just like adverbs such as "now", "sometimes", "yesterday"


I'm beginning to really feel my lack of grammar knowledge! I didn't realise how little I know!

Please don't let that daunt you. Just keep learning away.
You can also just use "to be"

Waar was de waterval? Was de waterval in de stad? Etc.

For something static like a house or a tree "stond" would be a good alternative

Waar stonden die bomen? Stonden ze naast de waterval of in de stad?
This is good to know. I wasn't sure if I could just use 'to be', as it seems like the Dutch use 'to be' a lot less than we do
That is true: less than English, but it still a valid way of saying it if you are not sure if things are lying, standing, sitting or hanging.


(I'm going to start listening now to see if this loss is common across all English speakers or just Australians). It is actually hard for me to guess what a waterfall might be doing. In my mind, it can stand, as the waterfall itself doesn't move to different parts of the stream, but I guess that's one of those subtle differences in the way different languages think, or the exact meaning of stond vs stood... or whether one considers the cliff behind to be part of the waterfall... I suppose the waterfall can fall...?
Yes it can fall, but we don't really use that much to express a location of something

Anyway, I really think I should think of something else entirely and change my story to avoid words like stroomopwards.
Either avoid it then or go all the way: Zij zochten stroomafwaarts de vossen stroomopwaarts. (up stream down stream)

I'm beginning to think I should just forget this storyasking thing altogether,
Noooo! :eek: Don't run away: you are bound to meet some obstacles

but I have to start somewhere with learning Dutch word order and nothing else so far seems to work for me either...
Please consider that a LONG TERM project. You cannot do it 'first'. It is hard for Anglophones, but on the bright side: it hardly ever leads to miscommunication. So just start chipping away at it. I'll be happy to correct whatever phrases you want to use.

Cgull
Lid
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 10:56 am
Country of residence: Australia
Mother tongue: English
Gender: Female

Re: I hope this is not too long...

Post by Cgull » Sat Oct 03, 2015 10:40 am

You are so encouraging! :D

Post Reply