Eruit

[voorzetsels]
Do we buy our train tickets 'in' or 'op' the station? Do we ask 'voor' or 'om' informatie?
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rsbbr
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Eruit

Post by rsbbr » Mon Apr 29, 2013 3:13 pm

I get confused with eruit.

Why people say for example: "Je ziet er goed uit." ? Can't they say "Je ziet goed uit."?

The er refers to what?

ngonyama
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Re: Eruit

Post by ngonyama » Mon Apr 29, 2013 11:31 pm

rsbbr wrote:I get confused with eruit.

Why people say for example: "Je ziet er goed uit." ? Can't they say "Je ziet goed uit."?

The er refers to what?

The 'er' is a separable part of the verb eruitzien. I think the 'eruit' means somthing like 'on the outside' and alludes at the fact that the person cannot observe this fact themselves. Eruit is a pronominal abverb that stands for uit+het. What the er or het refers to is left undefined but it means something like your own body that you cannot observe the way others can.

And no you cannot leave it out. Uitzien -without er- also exists as a verb but means something rather different: to look forward (to something= naar iets)



Louis
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Re: Eruit

Post by Louis » Wed May 01, 2013 12:59 pm

Yes, and more generally, "er" is short for daar, but is really a more of a substitute for "het"
Verbs like "ziet (uit)" need an object, but when there is no specific object, "er" is used.

B.v. Het gaat er goed mee ~ het gaat goed met het. Here the "het" is not specific/defined, so we use "er". You see it mostly with words like uit, as you mentioned, er van, er op, er door, er mee, etc.

If you leave it out, it sounds a bit strange, but everybody will know what you mean, I'm pretty sure.

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