een of 'n

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braaiwors
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een of 'n

Post by braaiwors » Mon Nov 28, 2011 9:32 pm

Hi alweer,

would it be considered impolite to use 'n instead of 'een' in writing? In theory it's the same thing and I do understand that pronouncing it would still be het Nederland 'een' and not my native muted 'e'.
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Re: een of 'n

Post by Marc » Mon Nov 28, 2011 10:40 pm

I don't know what the natives think, but I never do it. Just like I wouldn't put z'n in place of zijn in correspondence. However, in writing informal notes and on the internet, I always do that sort of thing.

The thing is, when typing it's probably just as quick and easy to hit the letter E twice and then an N, as it is to hit an apostrophe then N.

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Re: een of 'n

Post by Joke » Mon Nov 28, 2011 11:24 pm

Een is always pronounced with a muted e, unless the number one is meant, but then it is usually written as één.
'n is mainly used in poems and songs, if a full syllable wouldn't fit in the rhythm. In normal writing it is very uncommon.

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Re: een of 'n

Post by Marc » Mon Nov 28, 2011 11:26 pm

Yes, I don't think I've ever seen 'n in anything other than a poem, a song or a saying/proverb.

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Re: een of 'n

Post by braaiwors » Mon Nov 28, 2011 11:51 pm

Point taken en bedankt voor jullie reactie.

Come to think of, my English teacher pinched me several times for using abbreviations in my letters.

I still prefer to write letters;) something about the wait/anticipation I guess....
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Re: een of 'n

Post by Grytolle » Tue Nov 29, 2011 4:57 pm

I mainly see it in subtitles to save space. (That's also the only place that I see "d'r") :D
:-)

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Re: een of 'n

Post by Marc » Tue Nov 29, 2011 5:15 pm

Grytolle wrote:I mainly see it in subtitles to save space. (That's also the only place that I see "d'r") :D
Yes, in fact that's probably where it's most seen. I hadn't even thought about subtitles, but they do use a lot of abbreviations.

One day they may even fix the problem which renders één as ££n.

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