"Dienaar" refering to a female?

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beckdolf
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Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 2:24 pm
Country of residence: Germany
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"Dienaar" refering to a female?

Post by beckdolf » Sat Sep 14, 2013 2:48 pm

Hello everybody,

i came accross an old Dutch book, called "Martyrs Mirror" in English (Dutch name is "Martelaers Spiegel") written around 1660 by Thieleman J. van Braght. In there it talks about a person called "Ruth Kunsel" as well as a "Ruth Hagen". One is referred to as " een Dienaer" and one as "een Oudste".

Could it be, that back then, they used "Dienaar" as well as "Oudste" for males and females?

Would appreciate any answers.

Beckdolf

ngonyama
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Re: "Dienaar" refering to a female?

Post by ngonyama » Sun Sep 15, 2013 12:57 am

beckdolf wrote:Hello everybody,

i came accross an old Dutch book, called "Martyrs Mirror" in English (Dutch name is "Martelaers Spiegel") written around 1660 by Thieleman J. van Braght. In there it talks about a person called "Ruth Kunsel" as well as a "Ruth Hagen". One is referred to as " een Dienaer" and one as "een Oudste".

Could it be, that back then, they used "Dienaar" as well as "Oudste" for males and females?

Would appreciate any answers.

Beckdolf
No, I don't think so: dienaar has a feminine form: dienares.
Oudste can be fem. because it is a substantivated inflected form of an adjective. Superlative actually

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