adjectives

[bijwoorden en bijvoeglijk naamwoorden]
An adjective says something about a noun or person: E.g. "the beautiful story" or "She is happy".
An adverb says something about a verb, an adjective, another adverb, a phrase, or a clause: "You did that well", "That is really nice."
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jhess007
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adjectives

Post by jhess007 » Thu Jul 16, 2009 7:35 pm

hi.!how can you make an adjective stronger or how can you identify that a verb is a weak or strong type of verb.?would you please give me some tips?thank you in advance.

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Re: adjectives

Post by JazzedPotato » Thu Jul 16, 2009 8:07 pm

jhess007 wrote:hi.!how can you make an adjective stronger or how can you identify that a verb is a weak or strong type of verb.?would you please give me some tips?thank you in advance.
Hello, welcome. :)

I am not sure what you mean with making the adjective stronger, I suppose you mean superlative forms? (good-better- best, big- bigger- biggest etc)? .

In fact this is very similar to English. Normally (though like in English there are some exceptions) we add -er and -st to the adjective for example:

klein (small)
klein - kleiner - kleinst
small - smaller - smallest

However there are some irregularities and exceptions as well. e.g. ' lekker' (good, tasty):
lekker - lekkerder - lekkerst (basically I assume because ' lekkerer' doesn' t sound too well.. :P )

goed - beter - best
good- better - best

You can read more about it here: http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trappen_van_vergelijking


As for weak and strong & irregular verbs, this list I think probably is not complete but it will give you some idea of many of the most commonly used ones:
http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lijst_van_ ... Nederlands


In case you want to know how to conjugate the verb, you might use this tool (you can download it as well):
http://www.verbix.com/languages/dutch.shtml
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Re: adjectives

Post by jhess007 » Fri Jul 17, 2009 5:26 pm

tnx for the sites.I'll try to use them..the superlatives are easy to understand.
i just got some questions about the adjectives because yesterday I was trying to answer some exercises about the adjectives & it says,,i need to make the adjective stronger by adding a word..here are the examples..

lief
a.broodlief
b. poeslief
c. kletslief
d. kernlief
(the correct answer is b.poeslief)
nieuw
a. piepnieuw
b. kernieuw
c.springnieuw
d. gloednieuw
(the answer is d.gloednieuw)

but the problem is..I totally didn't get it..

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Re: adjectives

Post by JazzedPotato » Fri Jul 17, 2009 8:42 pm

jhess007 wrote:tnx for the sites.I'll try to use them..the superlatives are easy to understand.
i just got some questions about the adjectives because yesterday I was trying to answer some exercises about the adjectives & it says,,i need to make the adjective stronger by adding a word..here are the examples..

lief
a.broodlief
b. poeslief
c. kletslief
d. kernlief
(the correct answer is b.poeslief)
nieuw
a. piepnieuw
b. kernieuw
c.springnieuw
d. gloednieuw
(the answer is d.gloednieuw)

but the problem is..I totally didn't get it..
Ah ok now I understand the question. Sorry I thought you just meant using superlatives. ;)

Well yes, we use these kinds of words sometimes to emphasize the meaning of the adjective, to stress something.
For example:

' Ik snap niet dat Jan Smid niet langer met Yolanthe samen is.. Zij is echt bloedmooi!'
' I don' t understand that Jan Smith (a Dutch singer) is no longer together with Yolanthe.. She' s gorgeous!'.

'Bloedmooi' is constituted obviously of ' bloed' and 'mooi'. 'Bloed' is used to emphasize 'mooi'.

'Ja het is een schandaal! Nu is hij samen met dat andere grietje, zij is echt nog piepjong!'
' Yes, it's a disgrace..! Now he' s with that other girl, she' s really extremely young!'.

'Piepjong' consist of ' piep' and 'jong'. ('piep' is the sound a young chick makes that's just been hatched ;) ).
So 'piep' is used to emphasize just how 'jong' this girl is.
http://www.vandale.nl/vandale/opzoeken/ ... d=piepjong

We also use these 'composed' words as adverbs sometimes (the following examples are used as adverbs rather than adjectives):

' Doodleuk' - composed of 'dood' and ' leuk' (which I confess seems an intriguing combination. :D )
'Na een hele dag met hem op sleeptouw te zijn geweest om de juiste kleren te vinden voor zijn sollicitatie zei hij doodleuk dat hij besloten had om de baan af te zeggen!'.
'After taking him on for the entire day to find the proper clothes for his jobinterview, he deadpanned and said/ simply stated that he had decided to call the job off!'.
http://www.vandale.nl/vandale/opzoeken/ ... d=doodleuk

'Domweg':
' Je kan toch niet domweg klakkeloos al deze voorbeelden over gaan nemen?!'
'You can' t just thoughtlessly and carelessly (without critical thought/ simply) copy these examples?!'
http://www.vandale.nl/vandale/opzoeken/ ... ord=domweg

'Poeslief' is to say someone was being lief in an exaggerated, suck-up kind of way. Usually when they are either trying to
suck up, or to be sardonic or ironic towards the other person. For example:

' Hij vroeg poeslief of ik een leuke dag had gehad terwijl hij donders goed wist dat ik mijn auto was gestrand, vlak nadat ik zijn aanbod om met hem mee te rijden had afgeslagen'.
' He asked me, in a tone sweet as honey, if I had had a good day, knowing full well that my car had stranded just after I had declined his offer to drive along with him in his car'.

'Gloednieuw' is to say something is brand-spanking new, it's almost sparkling/ glowing.
'Ik kan niet geloven dat mijn mobiel nu al kapot is..Hij is nog gloednieuw!!'
' I can' t believe my mobile is already broken..It' s brand new!!!'

Some more examples of nouns and adjectives composed of two words (although sometimes not always just used to emphasize the adjective, moreover to make a certain aspect more explicit, such as ' hooggelegen' i.e. ' highly situated' or ' elevated' ) and their comparative/superlative forms ('trappen van vergelijking/ overtreffende trap'):
http://taaladvies.net/taal/advies/vraag/1205/

http://taaladvies.net/taal/advies/tekst/22/
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Plucking poppies for your slumber . . .
With the morrow, there shall be
One more wraith among your number
. "

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Re: adjectives

Post by kwalijkje » Tue Aug 11, 2009 2:57 pm

JazzedPotato wrote:' Doodleuk' - composed of 'dood' and ' leuk' (which I confess seems an intriguing combination. :D )
'Na een hele dag met hem op sleeptouw te zijn geweest om de juiste kleren te vinden voor zijn sollicitatie zei hij doodleuk dat hij besloten had om de baan af te zeggen!'.
'After taking him on for the entire day to find the proper clothes for his jobinterview, he deadpanned and said/ simply stated that he had decided to call the job off!'.
http://www.vandale.nl/vandale/opzoeken/ ... d=doodleuk
Doodleuk betekent deadpan? Hoe vreemd. In het Cockney Engels bestaat er iets vergelijkbaar. Dead met een bijvoeglijk naamwoord dat betekend nice. BVB: That's a dead nice dress you got on. or, You look dead lovely tonight.
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Re: adjectives

Post by Wim » Wed Aug 12, 2009 12:39 pm

Hi,

The meaning of some adjectives can be intensified by a real comparison, like ijskoud ('as cold as ice') or beresterk ('as strong as a bear'). Sometimes the intensification is not a real comparison, but a concept which is in some way connected to the adjective, like stokoud: not 'as old as a stick' (which wouldn't make sense, not even in Dutch :D ), but 'as old as someone who has to walk with a stick.' Other examples: doodmoe ('tired to death'), straatarm ('pennyless' - so poor one would be out on the streets) and piepjong (see above).

A special case is keihard: 'hard (solid) as a stone.' But as the Dutch word hard can also mean 'fast' and 'loud,' keihard is used to intensify those meanings as well. Someone could drive his car keihard around the bend and a radio may be playing keihard.

In other cases the intensifying part has lost its actual meaning and is used only as an intensifier, forming actually meaningless words (i.e., if you try to interprete them verbally). Originally they may have been meaningful (bloedheet - 'hot as blood'), but bloedmooi just means 'very pretty, stunning' although there is little beauty in blood. Other examples: knettergek and knotsgek ('nuts, mad as a hatter'), ladderzat ('smashed, blind drunk'). Don't ask me the origins of these tree examples :-D .

By its meaning doodleuk is an exception to this system. It doesn't mean 'very funny,' but just 'blandly, as cool as you please, just like that.' Sometimes ijskoud is also used in this meaning: Toen we op het punt stonden om het contract te tekenen, zei hij doodleuk/ijskoud dat hij ervan afzag - 'When we were about to sign the contract he told us just like that he had decided not to go on with it.'

Groetjes,
Wim

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Re: adjectives

Post by harold34 » Wed Jun 02, 2010 12:33 pm

Superlative degree means comparing 3 or more things. Superlative adjectives define the highest degree of a noun.
Examples:

The black dog is the biggest.
Ram is the tallest of all the students.
David is the wisest man I know.

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Re: adjectives

Post by Wim » Thu Jun 03, 2010 8:26 am

Hi Harold,

This may be so in English, but in Dutch it's not working this way. In Dutch it is completely correct to use a superlative when comparing two specimens: Ik heb twee dochters, de oudste is 15 en de jongste is 12 - I've got two daughters, the elder one is 15 and the younger one 12. Using a comparative form in a case like this would strike a Dutchman, it's highly unusual in Dutch, though correct in English.

Groetjes,
Wim

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Re: adjectives

Post by Grytolle » Thu Jun 03, 2010 11:25 am

harold34 wrote:Superlative degree means comparing 3 or more things.
http://www.google.be/search?q=%22the+bi ... =firefox-a

Afaik, the rule you state only applies to German
:-)

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