dwaas and zotte

[bijwoorden en bijvoeglijk naamwoorden]
An adjective says something about a noun or person: E.g. "the beautiful story" or "She is happy".
An adverb says something about a verb, an adjective, another adverb, a phrase, or a clause: "You did that well", "That is really nice."
Post Reply
Redbeeerd
Nieuwkomer
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jun 12, 2012 2:46 pm
Country of residence: United States
Mother tongue: English (United States)
Second language: German
Gender: Male

dwaas and zotte

Post by Redbeeerd » Tue Jun 12, 2012 2:55 pm

Hallo. I am looking for the most correct way to say 'foolish devil'. I thought I understood 'zotte' to = 'foolish', however online translation engines translate 'zotte duvel' as 'crazy devil'. What's the difference between dwaas and zotte?

ngonyama
Superlid
Posts: 1299
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 12:15 am
Country of residence: United States
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English
Third language: German
Fourth language: French
Fifth, sixth, seventh, ..., languages: Russisch, Xhosa

Re: dwaas and zotte

Post by ngonyama » Tue Jun 12, 2012 5:16 pm

Redbeeerd wrote:Hallo. I am looking for the most correct way to say 'foolish devil'. I thought I understood 'zotte' to = 'foolish', however online translation engines translate 'zotte duvel' as 'crazy devil'. What's the difference between dwaas and zotte?
There is not much difference. Also: duvel is a bit more colloquial than duivel, but quite acceptable. 'Zotte duvel' sounds a bit more southern to me than 'gekke duivel' but it's a matter of taste and nuance.

Post Reply