ik ging lekker mee

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An adjective says something about a noun or person: E.g. "the beautiful story" or "She is happy".
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brucenator
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ik ging lekker mee

Post by brucenator » Tue Sep 06, 2016 8:25 pm

ik ging lekker mee = I gladly tagged along?

Vanmorgen had ik niets te doen dus ging lekker met de uitlaatservice mee.
This morning I didn't have anything to do, so I gladly tagged along with the dog-walking service.

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Re: ik ging lekker mee

Post by ngonyama » Tue Sep 06, 2016 10:33 pm

That too is pretty common in spoken Dutch. Everything is 'lekker'. Even to have a bit of schadenfreude is lekker.

Hij moest al naar school! Maar ik heb lekker nog vakantie!

Parents frown upon children saying such things though. :D

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Re: ik ging lekker mee

Post by brucenator » Wed Sep 07, 2016 1:12 am

But then this...

"Iedereen heeft vakantie maar ik heb lekker nog 4 weken school."

Is this sarcasm? Or maybe she just really loves school !!!

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Re: ik ging lekker mee

Post by ngonyama » Wed Sep 07, 2016 12:54 pm

brucenator wrote:But then this...

"Iedereen heeft vakantie maar ik heb lekker nog 4 weken school."

Is this sarcasm? Or maybe she just really loves school !!!
We would call that 'voer voor psychologen'. (Fother for psychologists)

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Re: ik ging lekker mee

Post by BrutallyFrank » Wed Sep 07, 2016 3:26 pm

ngonyama wrote:
brucenator wrote:But then this...

"Iedereen heeft vakantie maar ik heb lekker nog 4 weken school."

Is this sarcasm? Or maybe she just really loves school !!!
We would call that 'voer voor psychologen'. (Fother Fodder for psychologists)
Sarcasm? Maybe! Sounds more like someone is having an argument, runs out of arguments and tries a desperate attempt to save his/her own skin by claiming the opposite. Or as we would call it: je vel duur verkopen (to sell your hide at a high price).
"Moenie worrie nie, alles sal reg kom" (maar hy het nie gesê wanneer nie!)

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Re: ik ging lekker mee

Post by brucenator » Wed Sep 07, 2016 9:11 pm

BrutallyFrank wrote:
ngonyama wrote:
brucenator wrote:But then this...

"Iedereen heeft vakantie maar ik heb lekker nog 4 weken school."

Is this sarcasm? Or maybe she just really loves school !!!
We would call that 'voer voor psychologen'. (Fother Fodder for psychologists)
Sarcasm? Maybe! Sounds more like someone is having an argument, runs out of arguments and tries a desperate attempt to save his/her own skin by claiming the opposite. Or as we would call it: je vel duur verkopen (to sell your hide at a high price).
Actually, "Iedereen heeft vakantie maar ik heb lekker nog 4 weken school" was the very first example that came up in the Google machine when I searched "maar ik heb lekker nog."

https://twitter.com/kimberrleeyy/status ... 6502593536

That is why I asked.

By the way, neither of your replies are in any way helpful, but, you know, thanks!

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Re: ik ging lekker mee

Post by BrutallyFrank » Thu Sep 08, 2016 8:27 am

brucenator wrote:By the way, neither of your replies are in any way helpful, but, you know, thanks!
Not really fair! If I look at your first post there's no question in there, so you could've been more specific about what you wanted to know.


The word 'lekker' kan be used in different ways:
1. to explain that something is delicious
2. like some sort of stopgap/filler to diminish the meaning of something that has been said (although it can be sincere)

The first one is pretty easy: when it has to do with taste (literally or figuratively): on its own delicious, but also used in combination such as 'lekker mals' (tender, about meat), 'lekker ding' (hottie).

The second is more difficult to explain: it depends on the situation. For instance: Da's lekker! It can be like above, that something is really tasty. But when said in an angry voice, it's an intro when somebody is about to start complaining: "Da's lekker! Heeft hij niet alleen een verkeerde investering gedaan, maar is zijn hele zaak failliet gegaan!"

Another example: 'lekkere jongen'. That is someone you have to watch. Mostly a notorious person. BUT I can imagine some cougar drooling and saying 'lekkere jongen' ... which would be more about lust.

And one final example: 'lekker belangrijk'. The girlfriend of a friend of mine used to go beserk when somebody would say that to her. By saying 'lekker belangrijk' is diminishes the importance of everything that's been said before. 'Lekker' and 'belangrijk' don't go together!

About your own example: like I said before ... it sounds more like someone is having an argument, runs out of arguments and tries a desperate attempt to save his/her own skin by claiming the opposite. A bit like a neener neener reaction ... It's something typical for kids.
If that kid was really serious about that, it's a nerd! A workaholic in the making ... or at best: an a-typical kid.


Bottomline:
If there is a rule for the word 'lekker' I'd say: when it has to do with taste or lust, it's meant literally (even though with lust it's more a pleasing matter). When used in other situations, it's used in a sarcastic way to mean the opposite. In that case: the higher the contrast between the word (i.e. 'lekker' and 'belangrijk'), the more clearly it is.
I'm not saying it's always like that (I can imagine it being used in a very subtle way), but on average I think it covers the way it's being used.


Here's a challenge: find some examples with the word 'lekker' and post them here. Then explain what category you think they would be in. We'll correct you and explain why ....
"Moenie worrie nie, alles sal reg kom" (maar hy het nie gesê wanneer nie!)

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Re: ik ging lekker mee

Post by estarling » Thu Sep 08, 2016 7:16 pm

brucenator wrote:ik ging lekker mee = I gladly tagged along?

Vanmorgen had ik niets te doen dus ging lekker met de uitlaatservice mee.
Hoi allemaal,

"ik ging lekker mee = I gladly tagged along?"

Ik vind deze vertaling niet lekker. Dat klinkt een beetje "te droog".
Ik zou liever denken aan: "I gladly walked along with (her, him, them)"
***** De onderlijning van fouten en de kritiek over deze tekst zijn welkom.

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Re: ik ging lekker mee

Post by BrutallyFrank » Thu Sep 08, 2016 8:09 pm

estarling wrote:
brucenator wrote:ik ging lekker mee = I gladly tagged along?

Vanmorgen had ik niets te doen dus ging lekker met de uitlaatservice mee.
Hoi allemaal,

"ik ging lekker mee = I gladly tagged along?"

Ik vind deze vertaling niet lekker. Dat klinkt een beetje "te droog".
Ik zou liever denken aan: "I gladly walked along with (her, him, them)"
Misschien heb je wel gelijk, maar ik ga daar niet over debatteren met jou en een Engelse native speaker. Maar zelfs dan denk ik dat Brucenator gelijk heeft: bij 'gladly walked along with' voel ik een bepaalde betrokkenheid bij de mensen waarmee wordt opgetrokken. Bij 'tagging along' denk ik meer aan iets vrijblijvends: alsof die persoon zegt dat hij er maar achter aan hobbelt. En dat gevoel heb ik ook bij 'ging lekker mee' ... dat gebrek aan betrokkenheid.
"Moenie worrie nie, alles sal reg kom" (maar hy het nie gesê wanneer nie!)

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Re: ik ging lekker mee

Post by estarling » Fri Sep 09, 2016 3:49 pm

BrutallyFrank wrote:
estarling wrote:
brucenator wrote:ik ging lekker mee = I gladly tagged along?

Vanmorgen had ik niets te doen dus ging lekker met de uitlaatservice mee.
Hoi allemaal,

"ik ging lekker mee = I gladly tagged along?"

Ik vind deze vertaling niet lekker. Dat klinkt een beetje "te droog".
Ik zou liever denken aan: "I gladly walked along with (her, him, them)"
Misschien heb je wel gelijk, maar ik ga daar niet over debatteren met jou en een Engelse native speaker. Maar zelfs dan denk ik dat Brucenator gelijk heeft: bij 'gladly walked along with' voel ik een bepaalde betrokkenheid bij de mensen waarmee wordt opgetrokken. Bij 'tagging along' denk ik meer aan iets vrijblijvends: alsof die persoon zegt dat hij er maar achter aan hobbelt. En dat gevoel heb ik ook bij 'ging lekker mee' ... dat gebrek aan betrokkenheid.

Inderdaad Frank, mijn opmerking was over een ongewone uitdrukking, voor mij.
Ik had het gevoel dat ''tagging along'' een toevallige computervertaling was in dat geval.
Dank u wel voor verklaring.
***** De onderlijning van fouten en de kritiek over deze tekst zijn welkom.

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Re: ik ging lekker mee

Post by gerardevers » Fri Mar 03, 2017 4:24 pm

Misschien helpt het volgende:
In bovenstaande zinnen is "lekker" een attitudineel bijwoord.
Dat houdt in dat de houding van de betreffende persoon t.a.v. de gedane mededeling hiermee tot uitdrukking komt.
Dat kan variëren van waardering (Jij bent lekker bezig!) tot leedvermaak! (vgl. Jij mag lekker niet mee.)
Hoe dat in adequaat Engels wordt weergegeven, weet ik niet!

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