Academic English-language degree programs

Here you can ask questions or share your expertise about Dutch and Flemish university courses, the educational system, tuition fees, study grants & loans, and English language programs.
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eastcoaster13
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Academic English-language degree programs

Post by eastcoaster13 » Fri Aug 12, 2005 7:06 pm

If there are any members of this board who have any experience with any of Holland's (or Belgium's) universities' international advanced degree programs taught in English, I would be very interested to hear about it.

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Post by barbara » Fri Aug 12, 2005 7:10 pm

In Belgium, there are not many English programs and those that are taught in English are expensive. Same goes for Holland. If you want to enroll in a university course that is taught in Dutch, you need to pass a Dutch test at the university. The NT2 certificate is also fine. I have seen this on a website, where there is much more info on studying in NL or BE (Bieneke, time you update your pages :P ). Will look it up for you and post it here later. Really have to go now.

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Funny...

Post by Geree » Sat Aug 13, 2005 1:41 pm

Hungary, where I live is much more undeveloped country than the Netherlands, but the education is totally free except for some VERY "high" academies. Even the schools where they teach in english is free. And there are some schools, where you can get some money from month to month if you study well. This money is useful for students from out of the town, so they can pay for the hostels, and other things. Aren't these things exist there?

:?: :?: :?:

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English programs at Dutch universities

Post by Bieneke » Sat Aug 13, 2005 6:09 pm

eastcoaster13 wrote:If there are any members of this board who have any experience with any of Holland's (or Belgium's) universities' international advanced degree programs taught in English, I would be very interested to hear about it.
I cannot speak from my own experience but I can give you a list of websites of English language programs at the Dutch universities.

English programs at Dutch universities

Uva (Amsterdam)
VU (Amsterdam) - Master's programs (and one Bachelor program)
RuG (Groningen) - Bachelor programs
Rug (Groningen) - Master's programs
University of Tilburg
University of Twente - list of Master's programs, many of them in English
Technical University Delft - Bachelors in Dutch but many Master's programs in English
University of Leiden
University of Maastricht Bachelor programs
University of Maastricht - Master's programs
Agricultural University Wageningen
University of Utrecht
Radboud University Nijmegen - English Master programs (no Bachelor programs)
Erasmus University Rotterdam Bachelor programs and Master's programs
Technical University Eindhoven Bachelor programs (only one in English)
Technical University Eindhoven Master's programs

Many 'hogescholen', insitutes for tertiary vocational education (HBO) that offer Bachelor programs offer English programs too. There are too many hogescholen to list here but do have a look at hbo.pagina.nl, a portal that lists the Dutch hogescholen.

In Holland, many courses are taught in English. This is, of course, a great advantage for foreign students but the instructor's English is not always .. uhm.. perfect, to put it mildy. But that's of course better than nothing and it's also handy that the course material and exams are in English too.

In Belgium, English programs are still quite uncommon.
barbara wrote:In Belgium, there are not many English programs and those that are taught in English are expensive. Same goes for Holland.
For Belgium, this is true. In Holland and Belgium, the tuition fees for regular courses are determined by the government. The English courses in Belgium are not 'regular' so the educational institution can ask a higher fee. In Holland, there are many regular programs that are taught in English. Most of them are Master's programs, the Bachelor you may have to get in Dutch (but there are English 'regular' Bachelor programs as well).

The tuition fees in Holland are quite high: for non-EU nationals about 1800 EUR a year. EU-nationals between 18 and 30 years old can be eligible for receiving a study grant (which is the highest in the EU) and a small discount in tuition fees (fee is about 1500 for grant-students). For post-graduate degrees, the tuition fees vary. I will post a separate message about the financial side of studying in NL later.

In Belgium, the tuition fees are very low: you will not pay more than 500 EUR a year for a university program. The study grants are very low though.

Updated on December 14,  2006
Last edited by Bieneke on Fri Apr 28, 2006 11:59 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Expanding Topic

Post by eastcoaster13 » Mon Aug 15, 2005 1:29 am

Thanks Bieneke!

I have been looking into these programs and will be visiting some of these schools in the fall....

But, let me expand my topic a little bit here...I am wondering if anyone can point out differences, caveats, benefits, etc. of Master's and PhD programs in Europe vs. those in the U.S. Specifically, if anyone can say anything about the typical 'true' lengths of these programs...balance between research and teaching...opporunities for employment in academia....

Thanks!

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Expanding Topic

Post by eastcoaster13 » Mon Aug 15, 2005 1:32 am

Thanks Bieneke! I have been looking into these programs and will be visiting some of these schools in the fall.

But, allow me to expand on this topic a little bit. I would be interested in anyone could comment on what it is like to get a Master's PhD in Europe (versus the U.S.). Specifically, balance of research and teaching, amount of time it takes to get degree (a PhD in 4 years, really?), and post-grad employment at universities (do they also shy away from hiring graduates of their own school, as in the U.S.?).

Thanks!!

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Hee

Post by Geree » Wed Aug 17, 2005 3:02 pm

I've got something I need to know...
Maybe it's a shame I don't know nothing about this, but what is:
- Master's programs
- Bachelor programs
I don't really know what does these mean. What's the difference?

Can someone explain it to me? :) :?:

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Bachelor's vs. Master's

Post by eastcoaster13 » Tue Aug 23, 2005 5:20 pm

The Bachelor degree is your typical University degree. The Master's degree is a graduate (post-Bachelor's) degree involving one or two years of additional study, and is necessary in Europe if you wish to study for a Doctorate degree (such as a Ph.D.).

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Bachelor, Master, PhD

Post by Bieneke » Tue Aug 23, 2005 5:30 pm

Hi Geree and Eastcoaster,

As Eastcoaster said, in Holland, you obtain your Bachelor degree in three years, your Master's degree in another one or two years. A normal PhD program indeed takes only four years. What the employment opportunities are like, I could not tell. I know that at the faculty where I studied, many professors came from other universities. Unfortunately, I do not know anything about the balance between teaching and research. If I were you, I would contact a few Dutch universities about this.

Bieneke

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Post by Guest » Fri Sep 16, 2005 1:13 pm

Hello allemaal,

To provide an analogous response to that of Bieneke:
In the U.S., your Bachelor's takes around 4 years. A Master's involves another 1-2+ years and basically involves studying something intensely enough to write up a small thesis or publishable paper on the subject.
And a PhD is largely a more-intense and certainly longer version of the same.
Big difference THESE DAYS, between NL and U.S. is the amount of time required. New Dutch laws require finishing a PhD in 4 years (or, at least that's when the funding stops), whereas it took me 6 years to finish my PhD in toxicology in the U.S. In the U.S., time for completion varies greatly - my sister-in-law needed 10 years to finish her PhD in theology (largely because the funding is so poor for that subject), whereas my brainiac classmate finished his biomedical PhD in 3.5 years - quite remarkable. I remember the school's brochure saying that 3 years was possible, but failed to reveal that it had never been accomplished...
So, even with the bachelor's (BS longer than BA) and Master's (MS, MA) and especially doctorate (PhD) in the U.S., the times vary greatly depending on subject, student, funding, supervisor, etc.
Employment opportunities are, unfortunately very dependent upon field of study. Imagine being a rocket scientist in the 50's, a molecular biologist, pharmacologist or an IT expert in the 90's, bioinformatics, now...
Not much call for rocket scientists these days...
The most common route to a doctorate is via a masters degree, but I never got one (got 2 bachelors' though, which is kinda' weird).
Re: ...employment in academia... let me say that my observation is that the Dutch system "for whatever reason..." is comprised almost purely of Dutch nationals. That is sad. I'm no flag-waving american, but the universities there are to be commended for hiring based clearly on talent with little or no regard to nationality. Hence, after completing a post-doc at each of the Amsterdam universities and seeing no hope of penetrating Dutch academia, I bailed and am now with a pharmaceutical company.
Re: teaching - that depends on the funding. Hence, high-dollar fields like the biomedical sciences can provide living expenses and tuition w/o requiring any teaching (my deal), whereas less lucrative fields like the fine arts may be very difficult to afford and still require teaching, which extends the time required before graduating.
Finally, as a PhD, let give a word of advise: DON'T DO IT!!! Unless you're absolutely sure that it's what you want to do. Very hard, frustrating work, for very, very little pay. In the biomedical sciences, at least, european grad-students have it a little easier, but the market recognizes that and often gives PhD's from the U.S. priority. Kinda' backwards from primary education where europe seems to prepare students better BEFORE the PhD. "Holland - that's part of Germany, right?"
Well, I'm probably wearing out my welcome on this forum, so I'll stop.
Veel succes!
Steve, in Weesp (yeah, I got a PhD, so what?)

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Flemish Universities: Academic courses taught in English

Post by Bieneke » Mon Feb 26, 2007 11:26 pm

[In response to a pm I received]

All Flemish universities offer at least a few courses in English.

The Flemish universities:If you want to enroll in a course that has Dutch as the instruction language: Most universities offer Dutch courses for foreign students.

It generally takes three years to obtain your Bachelor's degree, and two more years for your Master's degree.

To enroll in university, you must have completed (higher) secondary education. If you are at least 21 years old, you are eligible to take an entry exam, regardless of your prior education.
Bieneke

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