Flemish versus Dutch commonly used words

"Wablief" of "Wat zegt u", "zeker en vast" of "vast en zeker"? Vlaams en Hollands zijn beide Nederlands en toch zijn er veel verschillen. Dit is het forum waar je vragen kunt stellen over het Vlaams.
User avatar
Tom
Retired moderator
Posts: 505
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 10:41 pm
Country of residence: United States
Mother tongue: English
Second language: Dutch (Flanders)
Gender: Male
Location: New Jersey, USA

Flemish versus Dutch commonly used words

Post by Tom » Sun Apr 23, 2006 8:44 pm

Nu woon ik in De Kempen.
I live in "De Kempen" now.

I will try to use this thread to post word usage in Flanders that I don't often here in Dutch.

I noticed that they tend to use "de ganse dag" or "de ganse week" instead of "de hele dag" or "de hele week" ("the whole day" or "the whole week").

At first I thought it had something to do with a "goose" (gans). Well, that didn't make sense. So, I finally asked someone, and after a chuckle, the new word was implanted in my vocabulary.

Gans, is actually a Dutch word, which means "entire" as well as meaning "goose". It was just that I had not been exposed to its use in this way.

Hope this story helps others to remember it as well.

Tom

User avatar
Tom
Retired moderator
Posts: 505
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 10:41 pm
Country of residence: United States
Mother tongue: English
Second language: Dutch (Flanders)
Gender: Male
Location: New Jersey, USA

De lavabo

Post by Tom » Wed May 03, 2006 6:14 pm

In searching for an apartment I discovered that a washbasin (sink in the bathroom) is
"de lavabo" in Flemish while in Dutch it is "de wasbak" or "het fonteintje".

Tom

User avatar
Bieneke
Site Administrator
Posts: 1966
Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 10:18 pm
Country of residence: Netherlands
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English
Gender: Female
Location: Maastricht

Post by Bieneke » Wed May 03, 2006 10:39 pm

Having lived in Belgium for a few years now, I have discovered so many discrepancies between Dutch and Flemish. I am still causing confusion and chuckles sometimes but I got used to it ;).

English/Dutch/Flemish:

pen
pen
stylo

fridge
ijskast / koelkast
frigo

train ticket
treinkaartje
ticketje (with the emphasis on the 2nd syllable)

map
kaart, plattegrond
plan

microwave
magnetron
microgolf

morning
ochtend
voormiddag

afternoon
middag
namiddag

late afternoon
namiddag
late namiddag

noon
tussen de middag
over de middag

ten past eight
tien over acht
tien na acht

annoying
irritant
embettant

lighter
aansteker
briquet

heater
verwarming
chauffage

procrastinate, neglect
lanterfanten, spijbelen
brossen

poo
poep
kak

bum
kont, billen
poep

to fuck
neuken
poepen (quite flat)

vacation/holiday
vakantie
verlof

drawer
la, lade
schuif

stapler
nietmachine
nieter

(tea) cup
kop
tas

tea towel
theedoek
bordendoek

screw
schroef
vijs

screw driver
schroevendraaier
tournevis

to think
denken
peizen

a dress
jurk
kleed

beautiful
mooi
schoon

clean
schoon
proper

to clean
schoonmaken
poetsen, kuisen

receptionist
receptionist
onthaalbediende

boots
laarzen
bottekes

to cheat
sjoemelen
foefelen

because
omdat
vermits

sure
vast en zeker
zeker en vast

groceries
boodschappen
commissies (in Gent: commissen)

potatoes
aardappelen
patatten

fries/chips
patat
frieten

chocolat
bonbon
praline

En zo zijn er nog véél meer... Om maar niet te spreken over bepaalde constructies die hier vaker gebruikt worden of woorden die anders worden uitgesproken. Hier zal ik een andere keer wat meer over schrijven.
Bieneke

Kuifjeenbobbie
Waardevol lid
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Jul 04, 2006 5:37 pm

Post by Kuifjeenbobbie » Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:37 am

Sommige van jouw uitdrukkingen, die in Belgie gebruikt worden, lijken wel uit het Frans te komen?

Een vraagje: begrijpen Nederlanders de Belgische varianten en omgekeerd?

User avatar
Bieneke
Site Administrator
Posts: 1966
Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 10:18 pm
Country of residence: Netherlands
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English
Gender: Female
Location: Maastricht

Post by Bieneke » Sun Jul 16, 2006 11:06 pm

Kuifjeenbobbie wrote:Sommige van jouw uitdrukkingen die in België gebruikt worden, lijken wel uit het Frans te komen?

Een vraagje: begrijpen Nederlanders de Belgische varianten en omgekeerd?
In het algemeen wel, maar niet altijd. Als ik een woord niet ken, maakt de context de betekenis meestal wel duidelijk.

Dat er in Vlaanderen veel Franse woorden gebruikt, heeft alles te maken met de geschiedenis. Hoewel de meeste Belgen Nederlandstalig zijn, was het Frans de laatste eeuwen de dominante taal in Vlaanderen.

---
In general, yes, but not always. If I do not know a word, the context usually gives away the meaning.

The fact that they use a lot of French word in Flanders has everything to do with history. Althoug most Belgians are native Dutch speakers, French has been the dominant language for the past few centuries.
Bieneke

Kuifjeenbobbie
Waardevol lid
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Jul 04, 2006 5:37 pm

Uitspraak

Post by Kuifjeenbobbie » Mon Jul 17, 2006 10:21 am

Hoe worden de van het Frans afkomstige woorden uitgesproken? Zoals in het Frans of zoals zij Nederlandse woorden zijn?

Overigens: Tom : "Gans" is ook een woord in het Duits = "goose" in het Engels. Wij hebben ook een woord "ganz" = "entire" in het Engels.

Zo kan men niet hetzelfde problem in het Duits hebben :)

Maar soms in het Duits hebben wij een woord, waar Nederlanders 2 woorden hebben, bijvoorbeeld "nach" (D) = "na" (NL) en "naar" (NL). Na en naar heb ik vaak vroeger verwisseld :o

En ook bestaan veel instinkers tussen onze talen...

User avatar
Marco
Superlid
Posts: 439
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 10:41 am
Country of residence: Netherlands
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English (Great Britain)
Third language: Turkish
Fourth language: French
Fifth, sixth, seventh, ..., languages: German, Italian, Spanish.
Gender: Male
Location: Tolkamer, NL

Post by Marco » Sat Jul 22, 2006 5:54 pm

suitcase:

koffer (NL) vs. valies (B)

@ kuifjeenbobbie: volgens mij worden die woorden Frans uitgesproken, maar zeker weten doe ik het niet. :)

User avatar
Tom
Retired moderator
Posts: 505
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 10:41 pm
Country of residence: United States
Mother tongue: English
Second language: Dutch (Flanders)
Gender: Male
Location: New Jersey, USA

Post by Tom » Sun Sep 03, 2006 12:00 pm

Nu ga ik vaak naar een cafe (kroeg) in onze buurt.
I often go to a bar in our neighourhood.

Ik heb veel mensen daar al ontmoet.
I have already met many people there.

Hier zijn een paar dingen die ik daar heb geleerd.
Here are a few things that I have learned there.

In english we might say, "I would like to buy a round (of drinks)" and point to the people on the bar
that I wish to do it for.

I said, "Ik wil een rondje kopen."

I was corrected that they normally say, "Ik wil een rondje geven."
I want to give a round.

Maar, Trakteren is ook goed. "Ik wil een rondje trakteren."

Hier is ook iets nieuws voor mij.
Here is something that is also new for me.

A "Pintje" is a tall glass with ribs toward the bottom of the glass (with beer in it of course). A pilsje.

A "Boerke" is one without the ribs at the bottom and it is somewhat wider mouthed.
(Little farmer)

I think this is in Geelse dialect or possible only used in the "Kempen" (the area where I live).

Also, "kwit" is the local term for "gek" i.e. crazy.


I love it here. The people are very friendly and very accepting of me. It is a charming place to live.
They make me feel relaxed and that helps me to dare to practice my Dutch conversation, mistakes and all.

I feel that learning some of the dialet helps me fit in better. The only way you can do that is to
talk to the local people. Cafes are a great place for that.

I would suggest that for those who have to opportunity. The trick is to find a cafe which suits your
personality. Each has its own character and clientel, especially in a small town.

You may have to look around for a while before you find one. Then, if you go there often enough, the
people will get to know your face and see that you are a "regular". They are more prone to strike up
a conversation with you then. Once I found a cafe that suited me, I went there quite often for weeks
reading books and studying. Eventually, people began to talk with me. Once it begins you then meet
more and more people because they see you talking with people they know already.

My advice is "don't give up" and "be patient".

Tom

Snoezig
Editor & titelmoderator
Posts: 93
Joined: Sat Aug 12, 2006 8:59 pm
Mother tongue: English
Second language: German

Post by Snoezig » Wed Sep 13, 2006 9:07 am

I ran across this the other day: http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia: ... Nederlands. En voor Noord-Nederlands: http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Noord-Nederlands

Groetjes,
snoezig

zouzoufromparis
Waardevol lid
Posts: 66
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2006 4:19 pm
Country of residence: France
Mother tongue: French
Gender: Female
Location: France

Post by zouzoufromparis » Wed Sep 13, 2006 12:51 pm

Tom wrote:
I feel that learning some of the dialet helps me fit in better. The only way you can do that is to
talk to the local people. Cafes are a great place for that.

I would suggest that for those who have to opportunity. The trick is to find a cafe which suits your
personality. Each has its own character and clientel, especially in a small town.

You may have to look around for a while before you find one. Then, if you go there often enough, the
people will get to know your face and see that you are a "regular". They are more prone to strike up
a conversation with you then. Once I found a cafe that suited me, I went there quite often for weeks
reading books and studying. Eventually, people began to talk with me. Once it begins you then meet
more and more people because they see you talking with people they know already.

My advice is "don't give up" and "be patient".

Tom
OH MY GOD Tom!! this is so right what you said!! when i was in belgium 6 years ago, it was what i did too!
now i'm in belgium again for 5weeks, i have to start again ;-)
in which city are you?
i'm in Leuven btw!

see ya

lckarssen
Moedertaalspreker (native speaker)
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2006 2:55 pm

Post by lckarssen » Wed Sep 13, 2006 3:06 pm

Marco wrote: @ kuifjeenbobbie: volgens mij worden die woorden Frans uitgesproken, maar zeker weten doe ik het niet. :)
Niet helemaal. Er is wel degelijk een verschil met het Frans, het klinkt Nederlandser. De Vlamingen weten i.h.a. (in het algemeen) echter wel hoe de juiste Franse uitspraak is, vandaar dat het Franser klinkt dan het Frans van de gemiddelde Nederlander.

Een voorbeeld is "verwarming" (in het Frans "chaufage"), dat in het Vlaams als "chaufaasj" wordt uitgesproken, terwijl in het Frans de "-age" veel zwarder klinkt: "-aazj".
--
Not entirely. There certainly is a difference with the French pronounciation, it sounds more "Dutch". The Flemish (in general) do know what the correct pronounciation is, that's why it sounds more French than the French of the average Dutchman.

An example is "heater" [like in the central heating system] ("chaufage" in French), which is pronounced as "chaufaasj" in Flemish, whereas the "-age" sounds "heavier" in Frensh: "-aazj".

el topo
Waardevol lid
Posts: 43
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 11:21 am
Country of residence: Belgium
Mother tongue: Russian
Gender: Male
Location: Brussels

Post by el topo » Wed Sep 13, 2006 3:07 pm

Ik vind ook dat cafés in België ideaal zijn om met andere mensen kennis te maken. Ik heb hier veel vrienden in cafés gemaakt. In het centrum van Brussel is het zelfs niet nodig om Frans of Nederlands te kunnen spreken. Engels is dikwijls genoeg, vooral in cafés waar je meestal Vlamingen vindt.
Groetjes

User avatar
Bieneke
Site Administrator
Posts: 1966
Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 10:18 pm
Country of residence: Netherlands
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English
Gender: Female
Location: Maastricht

Post by Bieneke » Wed Sep 13, 2006 4:00 pm

@Snoezig:
Leuke links, Bedankt!

@Zouzou:
Welkom in België. :-D

@lckarssen:
Er is wel wat variatie in de manier waarop woorden worden uitgesproken, maar Franse woorden worden in het Nederlands meestal wel min of meer volgens de Franse uitspraakregels (en met een stevig Hollands accent ;-)) uitgesproken.

@el topo:
Wat ik zo leuk vind aan Brussel, is dat het zo'n internationale stad is. Ik las in de Standaard een artikel over een Finse diplomaat/journalist in Brussel, die uitlegde dat iedereen in Brussel tot een minderheid behoort (en daarmee gelijk is aan iedereen). Heerlijk gewoon. :-)
[perfect Nederlands, trouwens!]
Bieneke

User avatar
Tom
Retired moderator
Posts: 505
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 10:41 pm
Country of residence: United States
Mother tongue: English
Second language: Dutch (Flanders)
Gender: Male
Location: New Jersey, USA

Post by Tom » Wed Sep 13, 2006 8:57 pm

Dag Zouzou,

Ik woon in Geel. Ik ben nooit in Leuven geweest maar ik ben van plan naar daar te gaan.
I live in Geel. I have never been in Leuven but I plan to visit there.

Als je het leuk vindt, misschien kunnen we daar ontmoeten en een pintje pakken.
If you like, maybe we could meet each other there and have a beer.

Tom

zouzoufromparis
Waardevol lid
Posts: 66
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2006 4:19 pm
Country of residence: France
Mother tongue: French
Gender: Female
Location: France

Post by zouzoufromparis » Wed Sep 13, 2006 9:46 pm

Tom wrote:Dag Zouzou,

Ik woon in Geel. Ik ben nooit in Leuven geweest maar ik ben van plan naar daar te gaan.
I live in Geel. I have never been in Leuven but I plan to visit there.

Als je het leuk vindt, misschien kunnen we daar ontmoeten en een pintje pakken.
If you like, maybe we could meet each other there and have a beer.

Tom
dag Tom!

yes this is a good idea to have a pintje in Leuven and for you to come here! you'll see it's a nice city!
i'm here until' 15th october, so we can meet when you want(just warn me before, coz' i have my dutch lessons)
you can send me an sms and we'll see!
my dutch number is : [deleted by moderator]

feel free to contact me

see ya soon!

[Edit by Bieneke: I removed your phone number, zouzou, just to be on the safe side. I will make sure Tom gets your phone number ;-)]

Post Reply