een gezin [vs.] een familie

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HiGhGuY
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een gezin [vs.] een familie

Post by HiGhGuY » Sun Feb 28, 2010 10:52 am

Just wondering what the difference is? So far i'm getting the impression that een gezin is like immediate family (children and their parents), and een familie is like your extended family (the same as een gezin + aunts, uncles, cousins, etc..).

Is this correct? and if so, are there other examples in Dutch that use a whole different word rather than a modifier like in english? Like in english we could just say family for both, or if we wanted to be more specific we could just use a modifer like immediate family or extended family.

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Re: een gezin [vs.] een familie

Post by Grytolle » Sun Feb 28, 2010 11:37 am

The first part up until "Is this correct?" was right in any case :mrgreen:
:-)

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Re: een gezin [vs.] een familie

Post by Quetzal » Sun Feb 28, 2010 1:32 pm

Gezin is indeed the immediate family - the household, one might say. The people you live together with. When a child grows up, gets married, has children of his/her own and all, then if he/she talks about "gezin", it will refer to the spouse and children, not to the siblings and parents anymore.

However, "familie" is often used in that meaning as well. So "familie" can either be the immediate family or the extended one, depending on the context. If you say e.g. "Ik ga met mijn familie op vakantie", it most likely refers to the immediate family; if you're talking about the extended family, you'll indicate that somehow, like e.g. "Ik ga met mijn hele familie op vakantie".

As for your other question, I'm sure there are. One coming to mind is with "hat". I was once talking to an American friend, and I found myself looking for the English translation of "muts". I described it, and she said "hat". I said no, it's not a hat, it's something you wear in winter, usually made of wool, to keep your ears and head warm. Turns out that it is in fact "hat", or in some countries "tuque". But for someone speaking Dutch, "hat" just means "hoed", whereas a "muts" is a totally different word. It was quite surprising for me to find out that English only has one word for the two.

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Re: een gezin [vs.] een familie

Post by Vicky » Thu Mar 04, 2010 7:55 pm

Quetzal wrote:If you say e.g. "Ik ga met mijn familie op vakantie", it most likely refers to the immediate family; if you're talking about the extended family, you'll indicate that somehow, like e.g. "Ik ga met mijn hele familie op vakantie".
I suppose you say "Ik ga met mijn familie op vakantie" if you don't have a family (gezin) on your own and going with your parents and/or siblings. I can never say "Ik ga met mijn hele familie op vakantie" because it is too huge :D

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Re: een gezin [vs.] een familie

Post by Joke » Fri Mar 05, 2010 8:38 am

Vicky wrote:I suppose you say "Ik ga met mijn familie op vakantie" if you don't have a family (gezin) on your own and going with your parents and/or siblings.
True.

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Re: een gezin [vs.] een familie

Post by eeyoresmum » Thu Jan 11, 2018 5:22 pm

Quetzal wrote:
Sun Feb 28, 2010 1:32 pm
Gezin is indeed the immediate family - the household, one might say. The people you live together with. When a child grows up, gets married, has children of his/her own and all, then if he/she talks about "gezin", it will refer to the spouse and children, not to the siblings and parents anymore.

However, "familie" is often used in that meaning as well. So "familie" can either be the immediate family or the extended one, depending on the context. If you say e.g. "Ik ga met mijn familie op vakantie", it most likely refers to the immediate family; if you're talking about the extended family, you'll indicate that somehow, like e.g. "Ik ga met mijn hele familie op vakantie".

As for your other question, I'm sure there are. One coming to mind is with "hat". I was once talking to an American friend, and I found myself looking for the English translation of "muts". I described it, and she said "hat". I said no, it's not a hat, it's something you wear in winter, usually made of wool, to keep your ears and head warm. Turns out that it is in fact "hat", or in some countries "tuque". But for someone speaking Dutch, "hat" just means "hoed", whereas a "muts" is a totally different word. It was quite surprising for me to find out that English only has one word for the two.
Hiya - resurrecting an old thread. I got here because of the family/gezin discrepancy and was hoping there was perhaps a defunct Olde English word for it. Alas - 'close/immediate family' will have to do. 'Household' won't do, I feel, as there can be folk living in who are not related (f.i. paying lodgers, friends of children, old grannies/aunts - although part of the household, they are definitely not part of a 'gezin').

With regards to 'hat' - I found that the English equialent for 'muts' is 'woolly hat'. 'Muts' tends to be a knitted head covering anyway, so...
And as for 'tuque' - I assume the word 'toque' is meant?

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Re: een gezin [vs.] een familie

Post by BrutallyFrank » Thu Jan 11, 2018 5:30 pm

Ik denk dat 'beenie' of 'beanie' een goed woord is voor muts.

Tuque is een ander woord dan toque:
Tuque
Toque

Dan zie ik tuque wel in de betekenis van 'muts' zitten.
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Re: een gezin [vs.] een familie

Post by eeyoresmum » Thu Jan 11, 2018 6:50 pm

A beanie is a specific shape. Every beanie is a woolly hat, but not every woolly hat is a beanie. :-)

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Re: een gezin [vs.] een familie

Post by BrutallyFrank » Thu Jan 11, 2018 7:01 pm

Ja, een koe-dier constructie is het misschien wel, maar als je er over gaat nadenken dan zal het begrip 'muts' sowieso moeilijk exact te vertalen zijn. Juist vanwege het feit dat er zoveel soorten hoofdbedekking als 'muts' worden gezien.

De omschrijving van Van Dale dekt de lading (en het hoofd): "... zonder harde rand, ofwel geheel het hoofd omsluitend of ruimer."
"Moenie worrie nie, alles sal reg kom" (maar hy het nie gesê wanneer nie!)

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Re: een gezin [vs.] een familie

Post by eeyoresmum » Fri Jan 12, 2018 11:57 pm

Is een muts niet per definitie een - al of niet machinaal - gebreide hoofdbedekking?

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Re: een gezin [vs.] een familie

Post by ngonyama » Sun Jan 14, 2018 3:08 am

eeyoresmum wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 11:57 pm
Is een muts niet per definitie een - al of niet machinaal - gebreide hoofdbedekking?
Gebreid of misschien gehaakt, denk ik. Maar wel met naaldwerk uit wol of een andere vezel vervaardigd.

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Re: een gezin [vs.] een familie

Post by eeyoresmum » Sun Jan 14, 2018 3:57 pm

Is dat dus niet het verschil tussen een pet en een muts - een muts is gebreid en overall zacht en fexibel, waar een pet van stevig geweven materiaal is en altijd een harde rand/klep heeft?

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Re: een gezin [vs.] een familie

Post by BrutallyFrank » Sun Jan 14, 2018 6:57 pm

Waar plaats je dan een 'schuitje' (militaire hoofddeksel)? Of een baret?
"Moenie worrie nie, alles sal reg kom" (maar hy het nie gesê wanneer nie!)

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Re: een gezin [vs.] een familie

Post by eeyoresmum » Mon Jan 15, 2018 1:00 am

Meestal van wollen vilt, of acryl fiber.

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