Translations wanted, please.

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How do you say daddy-long-legs in Dutch? How many ways are there to say "thank you" or "you're welcome"? Post everything about vocabulary here.
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Philip M
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Translations wanted, please.

Post by Philip M » Sat Feb 06, 2016 5:50 pm

Please would someone give me transpations of the two following phrases from the song "Ketelbinkie".

Vroeg hij een voorschot op z'n gage
Voor 't ouwe mens in Rotterdam

and

De man een extra mokkie schoot-an

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BrutallyFrank
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Re: Translations wanted, please.

Post by BrutallyFrank » Sat Feb 06, 2016 6:27 pm

Philip M wrote:Please would someone give me transpations of the two following phrases from the song "Ketelbinkie".

Vroeg hij een voorschot op z'n gage
Voor 't ouwe mens in Rotterdam
He asked for an advance on his pay
for the old woman in Rotterdam
('t ouwe mens can refer to his mother, maybe his wife)


and

De man een extra mokkie schoot-an
http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/schootaan
'een extra mokkie' means an extra cup (mok) .... connection to 'mug'? (http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/mok3)
"Moenie worrie nie, alles sal reg kom" (maar hy het nie gesê wanneer nie!)

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Re: Translations wanted, please.

Post by ngonyama » Sun Feb 07, 2016 12:05 am

De man een extra mok schoot-an - for every man an extra shot of booze (in a mug)

I don't find etymologiebank very clear, but this old saylors' jargon is not always very clear either. I wonder if the English 'shot' and the Dutch term schoot-an are related. A 'schoot' is also a rope on a ship and 'opschieten' means to roll up a rope. It had to be done quickly, so now it also means: to hurry op.

Philip M
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Re: Translations wanted, please.

Post by Philip M » Tue Feb 09, 2016 5:28 pm

Many thanks for these translations!

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