Kant aan m'n Broek

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Philip M
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Kant aan m'n Broek

Post by Philip M » Tue Oct 25, 2016 12:12 pm

"Kant aan m'n Broek" is the title of a 1970s Carnaval song by a certain Rita Corita. Could anyone offer a translation of this title, please?

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Re: Kant aan m'n Broek

Post by BrutallyFrank » Tue Oct 25, 2016 12:46 pm

The lyrics are:
Morgen is vandaag niet meer
Kant aan m'n broek
Kant aan m'n broek
Vul m'n glas nog maar een keer
Kant aan m'n broek
Kant aan m'n broek
Is die feestneus echt van jou
Kant aan m'n broek
Kant aan m'n broek
Hij lijkt me wel een beetje blauw
Kant aan m'n broek, mevrouw
Geen tijd meer om te balen
Alleen maar adem halen
En wie zal dat betalen
Dat zingt de hele tent

It's not easy to translate. I did some research but I can only explain what it literally means. "Kant" is lace and 'aan mijn broek' means 'on my pants'. If you take a look at the cover of the ep ( click here ) you can see that she is wearing undergarment with lace on it. And that's what it refers to: lace on her undergarment (underpants).

I didn't find any special meaning of this song or expression, but I can think of two:
1. It's just some nonsensical phrase that goes with the can-can style dancing while showing the lace of the undergarment.
2. And this one is far-fetched: maybe it's an early YOLO-moment ... partying like there's no tomorrow and that lace is some kind of symbol for the status of her wealth now. And that's where I'm just guessing: I can't find any reference to lace being a symbol of wealth ... but the YOLO is definitely there: "Morgen is vandaag niet meer" = tomorrow won't be today anymore ... let's have another drink and keep partying :D/ it is a Carnaval song, after all.
"Moenie worrie nie, alles sal reg kom" (maar hy het nie gesê wanneer nie!)

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Philip M
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Re: Kant aan m'n Broek

Post by Philip M » Sun Oct 30, 2016 3:52 pm

Thank you, BrutallyFrank. I do not find "balen" in my dictionary. Does it mean "to have a ball (dance)" in English?

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Re: Kant aan m'n Broek

Post by BrutallyFrank » Sun Oct 30, 2016 7:55 pm

Philip M wrote:Thank you, BrutallyFrank. I do not find "balen" in my dictionary. Does it mean "to have a ball (dance)" in English?
No, it means 'to be fed up'. Usually it's 'balen van iets' ("Ik baal van mijn werk" = "I'm fed up with my job"). It's not as strong as hating something. More like disappointment.
"Moenie worrie nie, alles sal reg kom" (maar hy het nie gesê wanneer nie!)

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Re: Kant aan m'n Broek

Post by ngonyama » Sat Nov 05, 2016 3:45 am

Balen is a pretty young verb.

My father used to tell me that during WWI when Holland was neutral but cut off from colonial wares, people tried to grow all sorts of weeds as a replacement for tobacco. Not very successfully, so they typically ended up with loads of useless rubbish. So, if someone said: ik heb er tabak van, it meant I have loads of it (I tried to use it as tobacco, but it is rubbish). Then gradually people used the expression "ik heb er tabak van" in the sense of: "I have enough of it", I'm fed up. And you can still hear that expression today.

Later the word balen (as in bales) as added as an emphasizer: ik heb er balen tabak van: I've got bales of 'tobacco' from it: I've got loads of it (and it is useless). So it became: "ik heb er balen van" or "ik heb er de balen van". By that time the whole idea of (fake) tobacco was all lost: it just meant: I'm fed up with it.

The next step was that it turned into a verb: "ik baal ervan". Or even "ik baal als een stier" "ik baal als een stekker". What bulls or electrical connectors have to do with bales of fake tobacco is less clear. It just sounded cool I suppose and people no longer remembered what the meaning really was. So now we even have "baaldagen": days that you are in a funk and so on

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