Interline or page facing translation?

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khjaeger
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Interline or page facing translation?

Post by khjaeger » Mon Apr 20, 2009 2:31 am

Hallo, newbie here.

I learned a certain amount of the old Anglo-Saxon language from reading Beowulf with interlineal or page-facing translations.
Absolute literal translation does not seem to matter, as long as the translation is not too stylized, meaning, for example, one
which tries to preserve a certain style, in this case, alliterative. Example: Heaney's translation is very good and quite beautiful,
but maybe not quite ideal for learning the language.

Anyway, I wonder if anyone knows of books in Nederlands/Engels published in such a fashion? I think that reading a book with
the translation immediately at hand is a great way to learn.

I am getting bogged down in the traditional way of learning, btw.

TIA,
Kirsten

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Quetzal
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Re: Interline or page facing translation?

Post by Quetzal » Mon Apr 20, 2009 11:04 am

khjaeger wrote:Hallo, newbie here.

I learned a certain amount of the old Anglo-Saxon language from reading Beowulf with interlineal or page-facing translations.
Absolute literal translation does not seem to matter, as long as the translation is not too stylized, meaning, for example, one
which tries to preserve a certain style, in this case, alliterative. Example: Heaney's translation is very good and quite beautiful,
but maybe not quite ideal for learning the language.

Anyway, I wonder if anyone knows of books in Nederlands/Engels published in such a fashion? I think that reading a book with
the translation immediately at hand is a great way to learn.

I am getting bogged down in the traditional way of learning, btw.

TIA,
Kirsten
I have my doubts. Such page-facing translations are only really done with languages that the target audience knows or can decipher with some effort, and is interested in reading in, which I don't really think is the case with Dutch. Not to mention that there aren't really any Dutch literature works that are famous enough in the Anglo-Saxon world to make it worth publishing such an edition, as far as I'm aware.
But who knows. Maybe it's somewhere out there. On the internet you can probably find side-by-side translations like that, at least.

khjaeger
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Re: Interline or page facing translation?

Post by khjaeger » Tue Apr 21, 2009 12:19 am

Thanks for your reply, Quetzal.
Maybe I wasn't clear. It could also be English translated into Dutch.
:)
Kirsten

EDIT:
Sorry, I SO don't know any Dutch at all. Is the Dutch word for English not Engels?
I meant English <--> Dutch, not Anglo-Saxon <--> Dutch. A-S <--> Dutch would be a rare book indeed! ;)
Thanks,
K

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Re: Interline or page facing translation?

Post by firefly315 » Tue Apr 21, 2009 4:54 pm

Hi Kirsten,

Yes, the Dutch word for English is Engels, actually it is "het Engels" :).

Cathleen

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Re: Interline or page facing translation?

Post by Quetzal » Tue Apr 21, 2009 10:29 pm

khjaeger wrote: EDIT:
Sorry, I SO don't know any Dutch at all. Is the Dutch word for English not Engels?
I meant English <--> Dutch, not Anglo-Saxon <--> Dutch. A-S <--> Dutch would be a rare book indeed! ;)
Thanks,
K
When I say "Anglo-Saxon world", I just mean the English-speaking world. I guess that might be a direct translation from Dutch ("de Angelsaksische wereld") and potentially confusing for a native English speaker... sorry.

And yeah, good point, English translated into Dutch might have more of a market. ;) There should be some works of poetry and Shakespeare, then.

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Re: Interline or page facing translation?

Post by Jae » Wed Apr 22, 2009 12:12 am

Quetzal wrote:When I say "Anglo-Saxon world", I just mean the English-speaking world. I guess that might be a direct translation from Dutch ("de Angelsaksische wereld") and potentially confusing for a native English speaker... sorry.
We say 'Anglophone' for that, but that might be Canada-specific.
Mijn moedertaal: Engels. Mijn tweede taal: Duits.
Mijn derde, vierde, en vijfde talen: Spaans, Frans, en Nederlands (maar die ben ik nog aan het leren!)

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Re: Interline or page facing translation?

Post by Quetzal » Wed Apr 22, 2009 12:24 am

Jae wrote:
Quetzal wrote:When I say "Anglo-Saxon world", I just mean the English-speaking world. I guess that might be a direct translation from Dutch ("de Angelsaksische wereld") and potentially confusing for a native English speaker... sorry.
We say 'Anglophone' for that, but that might be Canada-specific.
Yeah, I would guess that Canadians, just like us Flemings, do that in analogy with the French "francophone"... unless the term is used broadly in other countries as well.

Edit: I guess we don't really do it that often, mostly we just say Nederlandstalig, Engelstalig, etc.

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