Does French have the continuous and modal particles?

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EetSmakelijk
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Does French have the continuous and modal particles?

Post by EetSmakelijk » Sun Feb 18, 2007 11:14 pm

Hi, people. This question is not really about Dutch, but I am really curious about whether or not French has something like the aan het continuous and / or modal particles.
1. The Continuous.
My reason for wondering this is that here we have a phone number we can call for the weather. Of course I usually call the English number, but I have listened to the weather in French before too. One of the things I notice when they talk about the barometric pressure is that in english it can be either rising or falling. In French, rising sounds like ...(insert number here ) et ā la haute.  Is the ā la part sort of like aan het?

2. Modal Particles
I know a song telling you to row your boat, that starts off "rame, rame, rame donc!"
Is "donc" something like maar or toch or something? If so, does French have anymore words like this?

I hope somebody can answer these questions and that I am not totally wrong. ;)
Groetjes,
ES, S'je, Saartje, of EetSmakelijk
:P
Mijn Esnips account is:
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Re: Does French have the continuous and modal particles?

Post by evilbu » Thu Mar 08, 2007 12:19 pm

EetSmakelijk wrote:Hi, people. This question is not really about Dutch, but I am really curious about whether or not French has something like the aan het continuous and / or modal particles.
I'm not exactly an expert when it comes to French either :D , but I wanna give it a try. :-P
1. The Continuous.
My reason for wondering this is that here we have a phone number we can call for the weather. Of course I usually call the English number, but I have listened to the weather in French before too. One of the things I notice when they talk about the barometric pressure is that in english it can be either rising or falling. In French, rising sounds like ...(insert number here ) et ā la haute.  Is the ā la part sort of like aan het?
Hmmmm, can you be more specific? What exactly do they say when they "ā la haute"?
Don't they mean the pressure "ā la haute altitude"="at high altitude"?

But yes, I'd say French has a continuous form : "le participe présent".
This is how you make it (well trick works almost always) : take the "indicatif présent" in the first person singular, remove the -ons and add -ant

So for "aider" : "nous aidons": "aidant".

So "les hommes aidant les pauvres"="the men helping the poor"
An interesting remark is the that there is no declension of the "le participe présent". (I often forget this  :o )

Another example : "By watching those movies, he learned a lot."="En regardant ces films, il apprenait beaucoup."

If you are interested, the direct translation from French to Dutch (this IS  dutchgrammar after all  :twisted: ) of "En se promenant, il est tombé." is "Al wandelend is hij gevallen."

2. Modal Particles
I know a song telling you to row your boat, that starts off "rame, rame, rame donc!"
Is "donc" something like maar or toch or something? If so, does French have anymore words like this?
I'd say the Dutch translation of "donc" is "dus".

So : "Je suis fort donc je peux aider."="Ik ben sterk, dus ik kan helpen."

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Re: Does French have the continuous and modal particles?

Post by Quetzal » Thu Mar 08, 2007 8:47 pm

EetSmakelijk wrote:Hi, people. This question is not really about Dutch, but I am really curious about whether or not French has something like the aan het continuous and / or modal particles.
1. The Continuous.
My reason for wondering this is that here we have a phone number we can call for the weather. Of course I usually call the English number, but I have listened to the weather in French before too. One of the things I notice when they talk about the barometric pressure is that in english it can be either rising or falling. In French, rising sounds like ...(insert number here ) et à la haute.  Is the à la part sort of like aan het?
Sort of, but "haute" is a noun, not a verb. "(number) and on the rise" would be a better translation in English. In Dutch I don't think we have an equivalent.

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Re: Does French have the continuous and modal particles?

Post by firefly315 » Sat Oct 09, 2010 6:35 am

Hoi,

I wanted to add that you always have to use "en" before any verb, which ends in -ant --- like you did the other times, but I thought that I'd mention it. :)

I added an "en" in blue font, where it needs to go about halfway through this post --- right before the words "aidant les pauvres," Then, of course, the rest of the sentence would follow or proceed the phrase, which starts with "en."
evilbu wrote:
EetSmakelijk wrote:Hi, people. This question is not really about Dutch, but I am really curious about whether or not French has something like the aan het continuous and / or modal particles.
1. The Continuous.
But yes, I'd say French has a continuous form : "le participe présent".
This is how you make it (well trick works almost always) : take the "indicatif présent" in the first person singular, remove the -ons and add -ant

So for "aider" : "nous aidons": "aidant".
So "les hommes en aidant les pauvres"="the men helping the poor."
Another example : "By watching those movies, he learned a lot."="En regardant ces films, il apprenait beaucoup."
If you are interested, the direct translation from French to Dutch (this IS  dutchgrammar after all  :twisted: ) of "En se promenant, il est tombé." is "Al wandelend is hij gevallen."
Groetjes,

Cathleen

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Re: Does French have the continuous and modal particles?

Post by Quetzal » Sat Oct 09, 2010 11:17 am

Actually, evilbu was correct there, though it might have been clearer in a complete sentence. But there was no need for "en" there. "Les hommes aidant les pauvres" = "the men helping the poor", though both in French and English it would be more normal to phrase it with a relative pronoun instead ("les hommes qui aident les pauvres", "the men who help the poor").

You do often see the "en" in front of a participe présent, it can mean either "by" or "while", but it's not a fixed part of it or anything.

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Re: Does French have the continuous and modal particles?

Post by firefly315 » Sat Oct 09, 2010 10:49 pm

Quetzal wrote:Actually, evilbu was correct there, though it might have been clearer in a complete sentence. But there was no need for "en" there. "Les hommes aidant les pauvres" = "the men helping the poor", though both in French and English it would be more normal to phrase it with a relative pronoun instead ("les hommes qui aident les pauvres", "the men who help the poor").

You do often see the "en" in front of a participe présent, it can mean either "by" or "while", but it's not a fixed part of it or anything.
Hoi Quetzal,

Oeps --- sorry.

Bedankt voor je verklaring. Dat klopt nu.

Groetjes,

Cathleen

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