Noun - Adjective association Game

Games we play within the forum itself. If you find a neat game on the web, I would place that post under “Resources and Reviews”
User avatar
Tom
Retired moderator
Posts: 505
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 10:41 pm
Country of residence: United States
Mother tongue: English
Second language: Dutch (Flanders)
Gender: Male
Location: New Jersey, USA

Clarification

Post by Tom » Mon Oct 10, 2005 5:54 pm

Yes, I can see why you might be bewildered, since the answers are not following a rigid pattern. But, they don’t necessarily have to.

Maybe it would be easier if we repeated the previous Noun / Adjective pair in large bold letters and then wrote the new Noun / Adjective pair in bold letters.

It is a bit like the psychological testing where you say the first word that comes to mind when the shrink says a word.

Thus if I said “fox” you might say “smart” because foxes are surely known to be “smart”.
If I said “fox” someone else might say “sly”, because of all of the fairy tales they have heard that describe foxes that way.

The rest of the sentences are there for illustrative support of the association. Of course, that may have to introduce the use of other nouns. Hopefully, the other nouns work well in reinforcing the relationship. But they are not the “key” noun in the pair.

Normally, I would not say “The rabbit was sly or cunning”. However, since Barbara wove her sentences into a story and prefaced this with the fact that the rabbit had a “cunning plan”, I thought that was great. Firstly, because “cunning and plan” are two words that go together and I think than many would agree to that. Secondly, a rabbit that is cunning sounds a bit absurd, but absurd things stick in our head and that is what we want. So I totally bought into the fact that this was “one heck of a special rabbit”. This series of sentences sounded like an excerpt from a fairy tale. Fairy tales always get my attention! I thought this was very creative.

Eet Smakelijk had used a pair which I believe as “cat / cunning”. She then used an auxiliary noun for comparison purposes “dog”.

On Barbara’s turn she used the pair “dog / loyal”. This is the step that lead to your confusion. Technically, the noun that should be kept is the main noun, in this case “cat”.

Anyway, it really doesn’t matter that much I suppose. The main thing is that we use “strongly associated pairs”. “Dog and butler” both have very strong associations with being “loyal”, so the net result worked out very well.

Hey, the most fun games we played when we were kids were ones where we bent the rules!

OK, back to the game. Let us say that the current pair is now
Nijlpaard – gezet.

And the next pair will be
X – gezet
Where X is someone or something that is universally thought of as being fat. Don't change the context of "gazet", as that word can mean other things. That will have the effect of breaking the memory association we are trying for. (For example, don't use "gazette termijn" - fixed term.)

By the way, I have not heard gezet used in this way before. I wonder if it is a less offensive way to say someone is “fat” (dik). I would appreciate if anyone could elaborate on what circumstances it is generally used.

Also, I am pretty sure the superlative should be “gezetste” and not “gezetest”. I hope some of our native Dutch speakers will help with the sentences themselves. Right now my brain is a bit fried!

Onward ….

User avatar
Bieneke
Site Administrator
Posts: 1966
Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 10:18 pm
Country of residence: Netherlands
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English
Gender: Female
Location: Maastricht

Post by Bieneke » Mon Oct 10, 2005 6:44 pm

'Gezet' is a more polite way to say someone if fat. It can mean anything between slightly overweight and seriously obese.

For adjectives that are derived from verbs (in this case 'zetten'), we normally use 'meest' (most) to make the superlative:

gezet - meer gezet - meest gezet
(not: gezet - gezetter - gezetst)
Bieneke

User avatar
Tom
Retired moderator
Posts: 505
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 10:41 pm
Country of residence: United States
Mother tongue: English
Second language: Dutch (Flanders)
Gender: Male
Location: New Jersey, USA

Learning

Post by Tom » Mon Oct 10, 2005 7:19 pm

Thanks for the clarification!

Making mistakes has its advantages, thats how we learn. :wink:

Maybe that is why I am a good learner. :lol:

The fact is that we are all embarrased when we make mistakes. Yet, I know of no other way to go about learning. Nothing worth having comes easy! There is always a price. The question is, are we willing to pay it to get what we want. It is a choice we all must make in our own time.

The way I look at it, if I stop learning, I might as well be dead. If I have a choice between death or mistakes, I'd rather make mistakes. I love learning too much!

Tom

User avatar
EetSmakelijk
Retired moderator
Posts: 691
Joined: Fri Sep 02, 2005 2:33 am
Country of residence: Canada
Mother tongue: English (Canada)
Second language: French
Third language: Dutch
Gender: Female
Location: Canada

Post by EetSmakelijk » Mon Oct 10, 2005 9:28 pm

De man was gezet.
The man was fat.
De mannen waren niet gezet.
The men were not fat.
Is deze man meer gezet dan die vrouw?
Is this man fatter than this woman? (Woman is the extra noun.)
Deze man is de meeste gezette man dat ik zie.
This man is the fattest man that I see. Do both meest and gezet get inflected before nouns or just gezet?
Ok, hope I haven't mangled the language too much. lol
ES, S'je, Saartje, of EetSmakelijk
:P
Mijn Esnips account is:
http://www.esnips.com/web/EetSmakelijksDutchStuff

User avatar
Marco
Superlid
Posts: 439
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 10:41 am
Country of residence: Netherlands
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English (Great Britain)
Third language: Turkish
Fourth language: French
Fifth, sixth, seventh, ..., languages: German, Italian, Spanish.
Gender: Male
Location: Tolkamer, NL

Re: Akkord

Post by Marco » Tue Oct 11, 2005 12:59 pm

Tom wrote:I have taken "schoon gedaan" directly out of the Flemish version of the movie Chicken Run. It is not said in the Dutch version that I have. Since I natively speak neither, I cannot tell if it is just a different translation or a difference between Flemish and Dutch.Tom
Ah, I see! Thanks for the clarification! :) So there's another difference between Dutch and Flemish! :)

User avatar
Marco
Superlid
Posts: 439
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 10:41 am
Country of residence: Netherlands
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English (Great Britain)
Third language: Turkish
Fourth language: French
Fifth, sixth, seventh, ..., languages: German, Italian, Spanish.
Gender: Male
Location: Tolkamer, NL

Post by Marco » Tue Oct 11, 2005 1:00 pm

EetSmakelijk wrote:Hallo, Tom.
Somebody here I think it was Wim said if you use the person's first name, i.e., Tom, you would say je but Mr. whatever your last name is would be u, is that correct people?
Hmmm, yeah, I guess that's a good guideline. :)

User avatar
Marco
Superlid
Posts: 439
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 10:41 am
Country of residence: Netherlands
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English (Great Britain)
Third language: Turkish
Fourth language: French
Fifth, sixth, seventh, ..., languages: German, Italian, Spanish.
Gender: Male
Location: Tolkamer, NL

Post by Marco » Tue Oct 11, 2005 1:06 pm

Hey Laura, let me help you with your sentences! It's already pretty good! :)
Laura wrote:Hello,
Mjin hond is gezet.
My dog is fat.
De gezette honden hebben een complete koek gegeten.
The fat dogs have eaten an entire cake.
De hond is gezetter / meer gezet dan de dienaar.
The dog is fatter than the butler.
Maar het nijlpaard is het meest gezet van allemaal.
But the hippopotamus is the fattest of all.
See, not that bad at all! Keep up the good work! :)

User avatar
Marco
Superlid
Posts: 439
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 10:41 am
Country of residence: Netherlands
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English (Great Britain)
Third language: Turkish
Fourth language: French
Fifth, sixth, seventh, ..., languages: German, Italian, Spanish.
Gender: Male
Location: Tolkamer, NL

Post by Marco » Tue Oct 11, 2005 1:11 pm

Hey EetSmakelijk! Only two small mistakes! Very good! 8)
EetSmakelijk wrote:De man was gezet.
The man was fat.
De mannen waren niet gezet.
The men were not fat.
Is deze man meer gezet dan die vrouw?
Is this man fatter than this woman? (Woman is the extra noun.)
Deze man is de meest gezette man die ik zie.
This man is the fattest man that I see. Do both meest and gezet get inflected before nouns or just gezet?
Ok, hope I haven't mangled the language too much. lol
(de man, die)

Yes, 'gezet' does get inflected in front of a noun, it depends on the gender of the noun. If 'meest' is in front of 'gezet' it doesn't get inflected, otherwise (as in 'de meeste mensen') it does. :)

definite de --> de gezette man
indefinite de --> een gezette man
definite het --> het gezette kind
indefinite het --> een gezet kind

Post Reply