wel then

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The Dutch use words like 'nou', 'toch', 'hoor', 'maar', 'wel', 'eens', or 'even' to modify the tone of a sentence. Their only function is to reflect the mood or attitude of the speaker. In spoken Dutch, there is hardly a phrase that does not contain one of these hard-to-explain words.
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kwalijkje
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wel then

Post by kwalijkje » Sun Jul 13, 2008 10:18 pm

Hoi,
I've noticed recently that 'wel' can be used in some cases like English 'then'.

1: We hebben dit niet meer.
(We don't have this anymore.)
2: Dan ik zal dat wel.
(I'll have that THEN.)


1: Ik kan niet jouw bestelling krijg.
(I can't take your delivery.)
2: Ik zal het stuur wel naar Denise.
(I'll send it to Denise THEN.)

I don't think my Dutch sentences are totally right. But is this observation correct, or am I just making connections that don't exist again?
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Quetzal
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Re: wel then

Post by Quetzal » Sun Jul 13, 2008 10:39 pm

kwalijkje wrote:Hoi,
I've noticed recently that 'wel' can be used in some cases like English 'then'.

1: We hebben dit niet meer.
(We don't have this anymore.)
2: Dan ik zal ik dat wel nemen.
(I'll have that THEN.)


1: Ik kan niet jouw bestelling krijg niet ontvangen.
(I can't take your delivery.)
2: Ik Dan zal ik het stuur wel naar Denise sturen.
(I'll send it to Denise THEN.)

I don't think my Dutch sentences are totally right. But is this observation correct, or am I just making connections that don't exist again?
Groetjes
You can't really say that there's a word-for-word correspondence, as we usually use "dan" in such sentences for the English "then". But I guess there is a connection of some kind, yeah. As far as one can determine the meaning of the word "wel" in those sentences, basically it indicates a sentiment like "don't worry, I'll manage" or "no hard feelings, it's fine". Leaving the word out would make the sentences sound a lot more curt and decisive, and might come across as if you're blaming the other person for the "failure" indicated in the first sentence.

While we're on the topic, if you replace "wel" by "maar" in both cases, you get still a different sentiment, indicating something like "oh well, you've screwed up but I guess it can't be helped". Where "wel" indicates that you don't mind, "maar" indicates that you do mind but are resigned to it.

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Ome Jorge
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Re: wel then

Post by Ome Jorge » Sun Jul 13, 2008 10:42 pm

kwalijkje wrote:Hoi,
I've noticed recently that 'wel' can be used in some cases like English 'then'.

1: We hebben dit niet meer.
(We don't have this anymore.)
2: Dan ik zal dat wel hebben.
(I'll have that THEN.)


1: Ik kan jouw bestelling niet ontvangen.
(I can't take your delivery.)
2: Ik zal het wel naar Denise sturen .
(I'll send it to Denise THEN.)

I don't think my Dutch sentences are totally right. But is this observation correct, or am I just making connections that don't exist again?
Groetjes
The Dutch wel is often used in the sense of probability. Like in your first example. Dan zal ik het wel hebben. Then I will probably have it. (But I am not sure.)
Wie voert dit klusje uit? O, dat doet Jan meestal, hij zal het dit keer ook wel doen.
Who is doing this job? O, mostly Jan does that one, he will do it this time as well.

It is also used for an action that has to be performed by somebody else than the speaker. In this case it is said like it is a generous offer.

Ik ga dat werk niet doen. OK, dan zal ik het wel doen. I am not going to do that job. OK, I will do it then.

OJ :mrgreen:

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kwalijkje
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Re: wel then

Post by kwalijkje » Mon Jul 14, 2008 12:09 am

Thanks guys. That really cleared things up. :)
Quetzal wrote:While we're on the topic, if you replace "wel" by "maar" in both cases, you get still a different sentiment, indicating something like "oh well, you've screwed up but I guess it can't be helped". Where "wel" indicates that you don't mind, "maar" indicates that you do mind but are resigned to it.
Ha ha, I think you're psychic in some way, Quetzal. I was reading my phrasebook on the bus home and found "geef me die er maar voor in de plaats" (give me that one instead then please, is how I translated it). I was gonna ask if 'maar' was doing the same thing as 'wel'.
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