Er + Naar in different tenses

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The Dutch use words like 'nou', 'toch', 'hoor', 'maar', 'wel', 'eens', or 'even' to modify the tone of a sentence. Their only function is to reflect the mood or attitude of the speaker. In spoken Dutch, there is hardly a phrase that does not contain one of these hard-to-explain words.
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mazzatex
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Er + Naar in different tenses

Post by mazzatex » Thu May 27, 2010 7:46 am

Hi there!

I have the following exercise to do:

Denk je aan die vergadering van vanmiddag?
- Ik denk eraan.
- Ik zal eraan denken.
- Ik had er niet aan gedacht.

So I guess the idea is to replace the indirect object (is that right? - an indirect object is an object introduced by a preposition?) with 'er'.

In the exercise above, 'die vergadering...' becomes 'er' and its used across different tenses. I'd like to complete the exercise across all tenses and then negate them. My attempt is:

- Ik denk eraan / Ik denk er niet aan. (present)
- Ik zal eraan denken / Ik zal er niet aan denken. (future)
- Ik had er aan gedacht / Ik had er niet aan gedacht. (pluperfect)
- Ik dacht eraan / Ik dacht er niet aan. (imperfect/simple past)
- Ik heb er aan gedacht / Ik heb er niet aan gedacht. (past)

I guess this will do for now (though expect a follow up over the conditionals at some point please! ;-))

The other exercises are like this:

- Ga je vanavond naar die video kijken?
- Denk hij nooit aan zijn afspraken?
- Begin je maandag met je nieuwe baan?
etc.

but I'm unsure of where to place things like 'vanavond' and I've also read that you can move the er...naar around the sentence.

If you could please point me to the section which deals with this or give some pointers, I'd really appreciate it.


Thanks!
Matt

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Joke
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Re: Er + Naar in different tenses

Post by Joke » Thu May 27, 2010 8:14 am

mazzatex wrote:Denk je aan die vergadering van vanmiddag?
- Ik denk eraan.
- Ik zal eraan denken.
- Ik had er niet aan gedacht.

So I guess the idea is to replace the indirect object (is that right? - an indirect object is an object introduced by a preposition?) with 'er'.
Your sentences are correct, but aan die vergadering is not an indirect object. Indirect objects indeed often start with the preposition aan (or voor), but the preposition in an indirect object is optional; it can be omitted.
See this page and this page for more information about the indirect object.

In your sentence, we're dealing with a prepositional object. Prepositional objects occur with verbs that form a fixed combination with a preposition. Denken aan is such a fixed combination in which aan actually doesn't really mean anything anymore.
In the exercise above, 'die vergadering...' becomes 'er' and its used across different tenses.
Actually, die vergadering becomes het (or better hem, since vergadering is a de-word). But somehow we don't like the combination aan het (or aan hem when not referring to people), so we change that into eraan. See also this page.
I'd like to complete the exercise across all tenses and then negate them. My attempt is:

- Ik denk eraan / Ik denk er niet aan. (present)
- Ik zal eraan denken / Ik zal er niet aan denken. (future)
- Ik had er aan gedacht / Ik had er niet aan gedacht. (pluperfect)
- Ik dacht eraan / Ik dacht er niet aan. (imperfect/simple past)
- Ik heb er aan gedacht / Ik heb er niet aan gedacht. (past)

I guess this will do for now (though expect a follow up over the conditionals at some point please! ;-))
Perfect!
The other exercises are like this:

- Ga je vanavond naar die video kijken?
- Denk hij nooit aan zijn afspraken?
- Begin je maandag met je nieuwe baan?
etc.

but I'm unsure of where to place things like 'vanavond' and I've also read that you can move the er...naar around the sentence.

If you could please point me to the section which deals with this or give some pointers, I'd really appreciate it.
Well, the chapter about word order is quite long and impressive, but here are some pages that should give you a start:
An overview of the main components in a sentence you can find here.
About the position of time (such as vanavond, maandag)
About the position of er.

Give it a try with one sentence first.
Good luck!

Joke

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