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NT2 and Nederlands als Vreemde Taal (NavT)

Posted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 9:16 pm
by Bieneke
Nederlands als Vreemde Taal
For information about obtaining a certificate "Dutch as a foreign language", you can visit:  http://www.cnavt.org (Certificaat Nederlands als Vreemde Taal).

This website gives you practical information (exam dates, fees) and allows you to look at example exams.

Nederlands als Tweede Taal (NT2)
Another official Certificate is the NT2 - Dutch as a second language. The body in charge of the exams is the Informatiebeheergroep (IBG) which you can find at http://www.informatiebeheergroep.nl. There are two levels, program 1 and program 2, the latter being more difficult than the first.

To register for the exam, you do not need to enroll in a specific course. You can study the language by yourself if you wish. For the exams, however, you need to be physically present in the Netherlands (as far as I know, there is no possibility to do this abroad).

For exam preparations (both Dutch as a foreign language and NT2), you can enroll in a course, of which there are many. If you have troubles finding a good and/or affordable school, you can always contact the local ROC (Regionaal Opleidingscentrum). The people there should be able to inform you about the possibilities in your area. I have heard the waiting lists can be quite long.

What is the difference?

Posted: Fri Aug 12, 2005 7:03 pm
by eastcoaster13
What is the difference between these two types of exam? Is one better regarded than the other? Other than studying as part of a Dutch-language program, when would such a certificate be necessary?

Difference between NT2 and CNaVT and what you need it for

Posted: Sat Aug 13, 2005 4:58 pm
by Bieneke
NT2 = Nederlands als tweede taal
CNavT = Certificaat Nederlands als vreemde taal

The difference between NT2 and CNavT has to do with where you live. If you live in a Dutch speaking country, you learn Dutch as a second language (even if it is your third or fourth foreign language). If you study Dutch in a country where Dutch is not the main language, you learn it as a foreign language.

What do you need the certificates NT2 and CNavT for?

CNaVT
The CNaVT is for students who wish to study Dutch abroad. In virtually all countries where Dutch is taught, the possibility to do the official exam is offered once a year. You can choose between four 'profiles':
1. tourism and information ("toeristische en informatieve taalvaardigheid")
2. general Dutch language ("maatschappelijke taalvaardigheid")
3. professional Dutch language ("professionele taalvaardigheid")
4. academic Dutch language ("academische taalvaardigheid")
For each profile, you will be tested on four skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking.

NT2
The NT2-exam is a state exam that takes place three times a year. You can choose between two levels:

1. Examenprogramma I is for people who are looking for lower skilled jobs and who are planning to enroll in secundary vocational (professional) education.

2. Examenprogramma II is for peoples who are planning to work as a qualified / high educated professional or who wish to enroll in an institute of higher education (hogeschool=Bachelor level, universiteit=Bachelor or Master level).

An employer will hardly ever ask you for the NT2 certificate (unless you want to work for the government, I guess. I know in Belgium you must have this certificate for jobs at the government). But for enrolling in a tertiary education course, the NT2 certificate level II is required. This is what the VU (Amsterdam) offers to prospective foreign students: VU

For more information, visit the website of the Informatie Beheer Groep, the official administrative body for education in the Netherlands.

Inburgeringsexamen

Posted: Sat Aug 13, 2005 5:08 pm
by Bieneke
In addition to what I just wrote, I would like to add that NT2 is also a part of the compulsory "Inburgeringscursus" (integration course) for newcomers.

The inburgeringscursus is not compulsory for EU-citizens and for Icelandic and Norwegian nationals.

It is also not compulsory if you reside in the Netherlands on a temporary residence permit, e.g tempory employment, study, medical treatment, family visit. Note, that for enrolling in a university, you may not need an inburgeringcursus but the university does require a NT2 certificate.

It is compulsory for all citizens other than the ones mentioned above, who are 16 years or older and who come to reside in the Netherlands for the first time. This also applies to holders of Dutch passports who come to reside in the Netherlands for the first time.

Inburgeringscursus?

Posted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 1:47 am
by eastcoaster13
Hmm...in looking into English-language Master's programs, I have not come across this Inburgeringscursus...can you tell me more about this?

And, er, not to think ahead, but how does immigration work in the case of, er, marriage? :shock:

(Thanks!! You are so helpful in this area...my boyfriend and Dutch friends knows very little about this area, and the embassy websites are, well, frightening and not-entirely-informative.)

Re: Inburgeringscursus?

Posted: Tue Aug 16, 2005 11:41 pm
by Bieneke
eastcoaster13 wrote:Hmm...in looking into English-language Master's programs, I have not come across this Inburgeringscursus...can you tell me more about this?

And, er, not to think ahead, but how does immigration work in the case of, er, marriage? :shock:

(Thanks!! You are so helpful in this area...my boyfriend and Dutch friends knows very little about this area, and the embassy websites are, well, frightening and not-entirely-informative.)
Eastcoaster, you do not need to to pass the Inburgeringsexamen if you come to Holland on a temporary (student) visa. You only have to do this when you are applying for a permanent residence permit, as is the case when you are getting married.

Inburgeringscursus

The Inburgeringscursus is currently being reformed and the changes should be implemented in 2006. The main structure will remain the same:
  1. Dutch language course (comparable to NT2). The minimum level you must reach is A2 (a European language norm, for more information: Dialang).
  2. A Dutch orientation course, where you will learn about Dutch culture and society.
When you apply for a permanent residence permit at the local municipal council, you will be informed about the ways to prepare for the exam. The courses are provided by different educational institutes. In the future, people who come to Holland with the intention to settle there, will have to pass the Inburgeringsexamen in the country of residence. This is an ambitious project and I doubt whether it will be implemented at all. For more information about the Inburgeringscursus, you (or your boyfriend, as the website is in Dutch) can visit www.inburgering.net.

Visa & residence permits

The IND (Immigratie en Naturalisatie Dienst) is not exactly known for its good customer service (to put it mildly) but they have an excellent website. Try their IND Residence Wizard to find out what conditions you need to meet when applying for a student visa or a permanent residence permit based on marriage.

Succes!

Language

Posted: Mon Aug 22, 2005 3:56 pm
by Sue
I have a GCSE in Dutch and moving there next month. As an EU citizen I don't have to do these compulsory courses, would people recommend that I do one, if so - which one? Or would you just suggest that it is better to learn through integration and conversation with people in the country?

Sue :D

Inburgeringscursus

Posted: Tue Aug 23, 2005 6:58 pm
by Bieneke
Hi Sue,

You must be busy packing by now!

Whether there is a point for you to do the inburgeringscursus entirely depends on your starting point. The module about the Dutch society can be very interesting but you may be able to study that by yourself. The course was designed to be comprehensible to everyone, including low educated people with hardly any knowledge of Dutch society. This may not be what you need. But you better judge for yourself. I know that apart from the ROC's, there are other schools that offer the inburgeringscursus. I just do not know which ones. At the city hall, they should be able to tell you. Then, contact the schools and ask about their programs. If you do, do let us know if you find any difference between the schools!

Bieneke

Bieneke

Posted: Wed Aug 24, 2005 12:23 pm
by Sue
No need to pack, I moved in May to temporary accomodation and because I knew I was moving to NL I didn't bother unpacking a lot of stuff! Most of my stuff is still in boxes!

I have e-mailed my local ROC to see what courses they provide, but the person is on holiday for another two weeks! We will see what she says when she gets back.

Thanks

Sue

Posted: Sat Aug 27, 2005 10:39 am
by Bieneke
Moving twice in such a short time span, you must have steel nerves :wink:

When you find out more about your classes, do let us know!

Groetjes,
Bieneke

what about a spouse of EU-citizen?

Posted: Tue Oct 04, 2005 1:11 pm
by Anja
Hi Bieneke!

I'm a (non-european) spouse of a EU-citizen. When applying next time for the 5-year residence permit card, will they oblige me to pass some exams or not? I heard there is some new law....

Thanks in advance!
Anja

Verplichte inburgeringscursus voor oudkomers

Posted: Tue Oct 04, 2005 9:16 pm
by Bieneke
Hello Anja,

You may very well be obliged to do the exams. The new law says that from next year, 'oudkomers' have to do the intregration course too. 'Oudkomers' are immigrants who already live in the Netherlands, as opposed to 'nieuwkomers', who are planning to immigrate.

Which oudkomers will be obliged to do the integration course?

All persons who:
  1. live in the Netherlands on a permanent residence permit at the moment the new law takes effect (probably on April 1, 2006)

    AND

    who have not lived in the Netherlands for eight years or more between the age of 6 and 16.

    OR
  2. who were 16 years old or older at the moment they immigrated to the Netherlands.

    AND

    came to the Netherlands before the new law takes effect.
For more information, see http://www.inburgering.net/pmi/inburgeringnl/index.html

Posted: Thu Oct 13, 2005 10:29 am
by Anja
Thanks a lot, Bieneke!

Well, interesting...
and if not? if i don't pass it, they will deport me? Deport a wife of a european citizen and separate the spouses? That sounds weird to me :lol:

What bothers me is that to pass the NT2 exam, I need to know the language really good (my teacher told me that I must study dutch for 3 years to be able to pass it :shock: ). This really takes time...
And now I'm taking Dutch lessons in Volksuniversiteit in Amsterdam, but it's just the language... not the culture and things like that....

Erg interresant jongens!!!!!

Posted: Mon Oct 31, 2005 12:06 pm
by iandominicp77
Hallo Dames en Heren,

:shock: Erg interresant posts ..... Ik ben Ian. Ik kom uit de Filippijnen. Mijn fiance is nederlander. Zij zegt dat de integration course will only start after I will get my residence permit - which will normally take 6 months after the application. Zij zegt dat I will not be allowed to enroll in a formal dutch course --- like attending a dutch class in school.... IS SHE RIGHT?

[24/11/05, edit by Bieneke: see also this topic]

Posted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 12:33 am
by Bieneke
Anja wrote:Thanks a lot, Bieneke!

Well, interesting...
and if not? if i don't pass it, they will deport me? Deport a wife of a european citizen and separate the spouses? That sounds weird to me :lol:

What bothers me is that to pass the NT2 exam, I need to know the language really good (my teacher told me that I must study dutch for 3 years to be able to pass it :shock: ). This really takes time...
And now I'm taking Dutch lessons in Volksuniversiteit in Amsterdam, but it's just the language... not the culture and things like that....
The instruments used to make sure people actively study for the integration exam are 'incentives and sanctions' (fines). What kind of incentives and how high the fines are, I could not tell you (yet). Failing on the integration exam will not result in a fine but, for example, not showing up for your exam without a valid reason will. Although there are a few politicians who plea for deportation for those who are not prepared to integrate, the measure of deportation for failing an integration exam :shock: is not seriously considered.