worden of zijn

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Regular verbs, irregular verbs, auxiliary verbs, compound verbs... When do we use which tense? What about those strange constructions the Dutch use to make a continuous? "Staat" my book on the shelf or "ligt" it? Ask all about Dutch verbs here.
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BigBadBill
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worden of zijn

Post by BigBadBill » Wed Jul 05, 2006 5:27 pm

i am having a problem with when to use worden and when to use zijn. i think it is because in english 'is' tends to be used alot for both cases. could somebody please give me a quick ' helpful hint' to make this easier to remember. sometimes when i write it is clear and sometimes i just have to guess.

alvast bedankt voor de moiete

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Bieneke
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Post by Bieneke » Wed Jul 05, 2006 6:18 pm

Hoi BigBadBill,

Lang niet gezien!

In the grammar section, a page is dedicated to your question. I will copy the text (half of it) below:

In the perfect tense, most past participles are preceded by a conjugation of hebben. There are, however, a few verbs that exclusively take zijn as an auxiliary verb.

Past participles that take zijn:
  • All past participles of link verbs.
  • Past participles that indicate movement, a development or a change. Examples are beginnen (to begin), sterven (to die), and krimpen (to shrink).
Past participles that take both zijn and hebben
A number of past participles can take both hebben and zijn. In general, the past participle that uses zijn refers to a movement. If the same past participle uses hebben, it indicates a static situation, in which we may be engaged in the activity of jumping or running, but not from point A to point B.

You can read more (examples) on http://www.dutchgrammar.com/en/verbs/auxv_2a.html.

Groetjes,
Bieneke

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Post by Joke » Wed Jul 05, 2006 6:34 pm

I think you were asking about the passive voice (worden / zijn).
You can find information about passive sentences at
http://www.dutchgrammar.com/en/?n=Verbs/Ot05

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Post by Bieneke » Wed Jul 05, 2006 6:52 pm

Ik moet beter lezen. :p
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Post by BigBadBill » Wed Jul 12, 2006 8:35 pm

Heel erg bedankt Bieneke en Joke,

ja Joke, je heb gelijk dat was mij bedoeling en de passive sectie legt het het best uit. ik wist niet die hij een passive zin was.

nogeens bedankt voor de inlichting en ik beloof steeds meer in te loggen :lol: :lol:

groetjes aan jullie allebei

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Re: worden of zijn

Post by tom3my » Mon Jan 11, 2016 5:34 pm

Maar de vertaling vindt ik niet echt goed. of heb ik dat nu verkeerd?

Mijn haar wordt gewassen. = my hair is washed

according to your site. But in the explanation:
Worden is used if the event is still going on at this particular moment. In English we would use the simple tense of to be, to become or, sometimes, to get.

is washed = is not really correct here, right? If i say my hair is washed, then i mean "it is washed, so not busy anymore" If it is being washed at the moment, i would say "my hair is being washed (right now)").
But dutch also use it a lot like : will be washed. That is why dutch often ask further if they want to know if it is done now or later : wordt dat nu gedaan of later?

Mijn haar wordt vanavond gewassen = My hair will be washed tonight. (cause it will happen later, not now)

Wat ga je doen? what are you going to do?
oh, mijn haar wordt gewassen. ohw, my hair is being (or will be) washed. On the answer later on you see that translation for this sentence should be "is being washed"
Wordt dat nu gedaan? Is that being done now?
Ja, dat wordt nu gedaan. Yes, that is being done right now
ok. lekker dan. :) Ok. good/ nice/ sweet/ etc...:)


Ga je dat nog doen? are you still going to do that?
Ja, dat wordt gedaan. yes, that will be done (or is being done) With the answer that follows you notice that this translation is "will be done".
Wanneer dan? When then?
Zo meteen. in a little while

So without time in the sentence it is more like is being done at the moment or will be done later.
And with time like "nu" = is being and with "later, vanavond, etc" = will be.


groetjes,
Tommy

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Re: worden of zijn

Post by ngonyama » Tue Jan 12, 2016 3:18 am

tom3my wrote:Maar de vertaling vindt ik niet echt goed. of heb ik dat nu verkeerd?

Mijn haar wordt gewassen. = my hair is washed

according to your site. But in the explanation:
Worden is used if the event is still going on at this particular moment. In English we would use the simple tense of to be, to become or, sometimes, to get.

is washed = is not really correct here, right? If i say my hair is washed, then i mean "it is washed, so not busy anymore" If it is being washed at the moment, i would say "my hair is being washed (right now)").

right now, sure, you'd usually take a continuous. But how about: my hair is washed three times a week? - mijn haar wordt drie week in de week gewassen. Here in the US people might say "gets washed" but that is pretty colloquial.

And "it is washed, so not busy anymore" is not really true for English. You'd say "has been washed".


But dutch also use it a lot like : will be washed. That is why dutch often ask further if they want to know if it is done now or later : wordt dat nu gedaan of later?

Mijn haar wordt vanavond gewassen = My hair will be washed tonight. (cause it will happen later, not now)

Wat ga je doen? what are you going to do?
oh, mijn haar wordt gewassen. ohw, my hair is being (or will be) washed. On the answer later on you see that translation for this sentence should be "is being washed"
Wordt dat nu gedaan? Is that being done now?
Ja, dat wordt nu gedaan. Yes, that is being done right now
ok. lekker dan. :) Ok. good/ nice/ sweet/ etc...:)


Ga je dat nog doen? are you still going to do that?
Ja, dat wordt gedaan. yes, that will be done (or is being done) With the answer that follows you notice that this translation is "will be done".
Wanneer dan? When then?
Zo meteen. in a little while

So without time in the sentence it is more like is being done at the moment or will be done later.
And with time like "nu" = is being and with "later, vanavond, etc" = will be.

And with "altijd" or "nooit"??

That is never done - Dat wordt nooit gedaan
That is always forgotten - Dat wordt altijd vergeten.

It is simply not true that English always chooses for a continuous tense in the present!


groetjes,
Tommy

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