The meaning of sentences

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Regular verbs, irregular verbs, auxiliary verbs, compound verbs... When do we use which tense? What about those strange constructions the Dutch use to make a continuous? "Staat" my book on the shelf or "ligt" it? Ask all about Dutch verbs here.
ngonyama
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Re: The meaning of sentences

Post by ngonyama » Wed Jun 17, 2015 10:03 pm

teossh wrote:1. Een been moeten missen.
2. Angst om iets te moeten missen.
Can someone explain the usage of 'moeten missen' in both sentences?
Thank you.
Een been moeten missen - to have to live without a leg.
Angst om iets te moeten missen - Fear to have to do without something

Missen is similar to to miss in sentences like:

I mis je zo - I miss you so much.

But in Dutch it is used in somewhat different ways. It always means something like experiencing that something is missing, often painfully so.

Moeten is either must orto have to

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Re: The meaning of sentences

Post by teossh » Wed Jun 24, 2015 9:06 am

Nyonyama, thanks for the explanation for my previous post.

S1: Er speelt niet eens een glimlach om zijn lippen.
S2: Er valt niets uit te lezen.
S3: Dat is een zorg minder.
S4: Zorg dat je er bent vrijdag.

Q1: Can someone translate above sentences into English?
Q2: Is 'spelen' a common verb for describing the condition in S1?
Q3: Is 'vallen' a helping verb in S2? Does 'vallen' carry any meaning in S2?

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Re: The meaning of sentences

Post by Crecker » Thu Jun 25, 2015 12:30 am

Hello teossh, I'd like to try to help you.

Q1:
S1: He doesn't even make a smile. (But I'm not sure whether this is the right translation)
S2: There's nothing to read.
S3: That's a minor worry (since there are more important problems).
S4: Make sure your are there on Friday.

Q2: For this question I would wait for a native speaker.

Q3: Yes, 'vallen' can act as a modal verb (vallen + te + infinitive). In this case it has the meaning of 'to be', but you can also find sentences where it means 'to be able to':
"Je valt niet te beschrijven met woorden" = "You are not able to describe (anything) with words"
ImageImage
Geef me een kus,
Geef me een kus,
Geef me een kus,
En vlug, voor de laatste bus...

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Re: The meaning of sentences

Post by ngonyama » Thu Jun 25, 2015 6:17 am

teossh wrote:Nyonyama, thanks for the explanation for my previous post.

S1: Er speelt niet eens een glimlach om zijn lippen. There is not even a smile playing around his lips
S2: Er valt niets uit te lezen. Nothing can be gleaned from it
S3: Dat is een zorg minder. That is one worry less.
S4: Zorg dat je er bent vrijdag. Make sure you are there on Friday

Q1: Can someone translate above sentences into English?
Q2: Is 'spelen' a common verb for describing the condition in S1? No, it poetic license
Q3: Is 'vallen' a helping verb in S2? Does 'vallen' carry any meaning in S2?
Yes, "er valt niets te" is a standard expression indicating that the case (geval) never occurs. Think of where the chips fall or where the dice fall when they are cast. You can also use it in a positive way:

Er viel rijke buit te behalen -- Much loot was to be had there.

Notice also in S2 that the original meaning of the verb 'lezen' is to walk a field that is being harvested and to pick (lezen) full ears of grain from amidst the straw. (In English that is to glean, so sometimes that produces a better English translation).

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Re: The meaning of sentences

Post by teossh » Wed Jul 15, 2015 10:33 am

ngonyama, thank you for your reply to my last post. :)

S1.Ik ben bang dat hij er gewoon bij is gaan horen.
Q1: Can someone translate S1 into English and explain the usage of 'is gaan horen?'

Q2: horen and behoren, are they interchangeable?

Q3.What are the difference between 'erachter komen' and 'erachter moet komen'?

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Re: The meaning of sentences

Post by ngonyama » Wed Jul 15, 2015 8:33 pm

teossh wrote:ngonyama, thank you for your reply to my last post. :)
you're welcome


S1.Ik ben bang dat hij er gewoon bij is gaan horen.

I am afraid that he has just come to be considered part of the crowd


Q1: Can someone translate S1 into English and explain the usage of 'is gaan horen?

Hij hoort erbij - he belongs to us / them /whatever
Hij gaat erbij horen - He is starting to belong to the crowd
Hij is erbij gaan horen - the perfect tense of the above
'

Q2: horen and behoren, are they interchangeable?
hmm. no not really. There are many instances of 'horen' that cannot be replaced by 'behoren', like:

ik hoor muziek!

But in many cases where we used to say 'behoren' people now drop the 'be' in colloquial speech:

Doe zoals het (be)hoort!


Q3.What are the difference between 'erachter komen' and 'erachter moet komen'?
to find out versus having to find out / must find out

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Re: The meaning of sentences

Post by BrutallyFrank » Wed Jul 15, 2015 9:01 pm

S1.Ik ben bang dat hij er gewoon bij is gaan horen.

I am afraid that he has just come to be considered part of the crowd
Zou het niet beter zijn om te zeggen: I'm afraid he has just become part of the crowd
"Moenie worrie nie, alles sal reg kom" (maar hy het nie gesê wanneer nie!)

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