Is dwingen an om-verb?

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beloeng
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Is dwingen an om-verb?

Post by beloeng » Tue Dec 15, 2015 11:18 am

Hi guys!

I'm new in here. Dutchgrammar.com is a great resource for learning Dutch, and I look forward to learn even more from these forums. :)

Now, here is my question:

Are both these sentences correct?
Ik dwing jou te zitten.
Ik dwing jou om te zitten.

Duolingo seems to accept both, but dwingen is not in this list - http://www.dutchgrammar.com/en/?n=Verbs.Au11 - so I am asking just to be sure. Thanks!

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BrutallyFrank
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Re: Is dwingen an om-verb?

Post by BrutallyFrank » Wed Dec 16, 2015 12:22 pm

beloeng wrote:Hi guys!

I'm new in here. Dutchgrammar.com is a great resource for learning Dutch, and I look forward to learn even more from these forums. :)

Now, here is my question:

Are both these sentences correct?
Ik dwing jou te zitten.
Ik dwing jou om te zitten.

Duolingo seems to accept both, but dwingen is not in this list - http://www.dutchgrammar.com/en/?n=Verbs.Au11 - so I am asking just to be sure. Thanks!
First of all: welcome, Beloeng!

To answer your question: the word 'om' functions as a subordinating conjunction which introduces a non-finite clause.

Both sentences are correct, because it's ok to leave 'om' out when it's possible. Although there is something called the 'schoolmeesterregel' (schoolmaster's rule)

Translation from OnzeTaal website:
In spoken language 'om' is almost always used. Leaving it out seems a bit stiff and formal. Years ago schoolmasters would've have taken a red pencil through the word 'om'. The reasoning behind it was: only use the word 'om' if it serves an intention, an objective or a meaning. In other words: if you could replace it with the word 'teneinde' (in order to).
Examples:
I go to the bakery in order to get bread
They go to the beach in order to tan
I gave him some money in order to buy a book

The schoolmaster's rule applies in this case because you can't leave 'om' out of these sentences. But it certainly isn't the case that 'om' has to be used exclusively in these sentences. It's best to consider it to be a means to make the structure of a composed sentence more transparent or to accomodate the sentence. You can still leave it out - if you want to give it a formal touch - but it's ok to use it without hesitation.

If you are in doubt it's best to choose to leave the word 'om' in. This way you avoid to leave it out where you're obliged to use it.
https://onzetaal.nl/taaladvies/advies/om-wel-of-geen-om
"Moenie worrie nie, alles sal reg kom" (maar hy het nie gesê wanneer nie!)

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