long/short vowel

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celestesa4
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long/short vowel

Post by celestesa4 » Fri Mar 02, 2012 10:15 am

Hi!
I'm reading the Spelling & pronunciation chapter. To know if it's a short or a long vowel it says the following:

If you cut the word up and the vowel is in the end of the syllable => long vowel
If you cut the word up and after the vowel you find a consonant => short vowel

Hitherto is OK.

But reviewing everything I got in trouble...
How can I differentiate (sonorously) the long double vowel (which does no depends to be a long vowel having a consonant behind or not) from the normal short vowel?

for example:

LONG VOWEL
double vowel like: kaart => behind the "aa" we find a consonant

SHORT VOWEL
fregat => behind the "a" we find a consonant, and that's why it is a short vowel

The sound form both ("a" and "aa") in these words are the same. (isn't it?)
So, how can I differentiate both of them when somebody dictate what you've to write?

Waiting for your answer, thank's you A LOT! :)
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celestesa4
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Re: long/short vowel

Post by celestesa4 » Fri Mar 02, 2012 9:55 pm

I think that I know the answer... #-o
It does NOT sounds the same!
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Joke
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Re: long/short vowel

Post by Joke » Fri Mar 02, 2012 10:22 pm

Looks like you solved your own problem already.
You're right, the sounds of a and aa are different in Dutch. For Dutch people this is a very clear difference, but if your native language has only one a sound, it can be difficult to hear. It helps to listen to a lot of examples. Here and here you can listen to the different vowel sounds. I guess you can find more on youtube too.

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Bert
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Re: long/short vowel

Post by Bert » Fri Mar 02, 2012 10:36 pm

celestesa4 wrote:So, how can I differentiate both of them when somebody dictate what you've to write?
If you create a decent vocabulary for yourself, you'll be able to recognise the words you hear. For example, when you listen to the radio and hear "En nu het weer", you will remember that 'het weer' ([wer], not [wɛr]) means 'the weather'. Otherwise (without prior knowledge) it can be quite misleading, for instance if you hear this: [rɛizə(n)], you will not know whether it's 'reizen' or 'rijzen' (of course, your prior knowledge and the context can help).

celestesa4
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Re: long/short vowel

Post by celestesa4 » Fri Mar 02, 2012 10:59 pm

Bedankt voor je hulp ;-)
ja... Er zijn dingen dat geen regels of indicaties hebben, dus alles wat ik kan doen is veel lezen en veel schrijven! Ik nodig jullie uit om in het verhaaltjes deel van het forum binnenkomen en mijn verhalen lezen met de onderwerp: "Raadzel verhaaltjes. Wie is het?". Dankje!

Thanks for your help ;-)
Yes.. There are things that have no rules or indications, so everything what I can do is read and write a lot! I invite you to enter to the histories part from the forum and to read my histories with the tittle: "riddle histories. Who is it?". Thanks!
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