Pronunciation

[spelling en uitspraak]
How do you pronounce 'gezellig'? What is the difference between 'eu' and 'ui'? How do you write...? You can use the phonetic keyboard if you are familiar with phonetic symbols.
[Jan. 12, 2008: due to the forum update, the phonetic keyboard has been temporarily disabled.]
User avatar
cachirro
Lid
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Jan 24, 2014 11:23 pm
Country of residence: Netherlands
Mother tongue: Portuguese
Second language: English
Gender: Male

Re: Pronunciation

Post by cachirro » Mon Apr 07, 2014 7:14 pm

1. i'm sorry, but i'm not following. your english examples "finger" and "singer", because in those, you speak the G in english.
as another example, someone sayd that the ending G is not pronounced, like "kinderopvang", but what to say about "dag" then? it is pronounced as the R sound.
so, i remain with doubts about "ding" or "koning", hmmm, now that i think of it, i just can remember words that have NG together, from those examples that i don't ear the R sound on the Gs, so is that it? every word with NG you kinda just say the N?

2. guess i have to study some more, all those closed, stressed, unstressed just gave me a knot in my brain, but thanks fro helping :-D

ngonyama
Superlid
Posts: 1299
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 12:15 am
Country of residence: United States
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English
Third language: German
Fourth language: French
Fifth, sixth, seventh, ..., languages: Russisch, Xhosa

Re: Pronunciation

Post by ngonyama » Mon Apr 07, 2014 9:44 pm

cachirro wrote:1. i'm sorry, but i'm not following. your english examples "finger" and "singer", because in those, you speak the G in english.

No you don't. Singer is /ˈsɪŋə/ See http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/singer. Finger is /ˈfɪŋɡə(ɹ)/ see: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/finger#English

as another example, someone sayd that the ending G is not pronounced, like "kinderopvang", but what to say about "dag" then? it is pronounced as the R sound.

Yes, kinderopvang ends in /ŋ/, dag ends in /x/

so, i remain with doubts about "ding" or "koning", hmmm, now that i think of it, i just can remember words that have NG together, from those examples that i don't ear the R sound on the Gs, so is that it? every word with NG you kinda just say the N?

It is a nasal sound farther back in your mouth roughly at the position where /k/ and /g/ and /x/ are formed. The /n/ sounds is a nasal produced at the position where the /t/ and /d/ are formed.

2. guess i have to study some more, all those closed, stressed, unstressed just gave me a knot in my brain, but thanks fro helping :-D

ngonyama
Superlid
Posts: 1299
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 12:15 am
Country of residence: United States
Mother tongue: Dutch (Netherlands)
Second language: English
Third language: German
Fourth language: French
Fifth, sixth, seventh, ..., languages: Russisch, Xhosa

Re: Pronunciation

Post by ngonyama » Mon Apr 07, 2014 9:53 pm

Your problem may be that neither Portuguese nor Spanish have velar /ŋ/. They do have the palatal /ɲ/ as in -nh-, but the velar is even farther back in your throat.

DaisyBrussels
Nieuwkomer
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri May 09, 2014 10:53 pm
Mother tongue: Afrikaans
Second language: English (Africa)
Gender: Female

Re: Pronunciation

Post by DaisyBrussels » Fri May 09, 2014 11:12 pm

Amazingly helpful to learn how to pronounce the 'IJ' is this video:
http://www.learndutch.rozemarijnonline. ... dutch.html
Also the origin of this strange letter 'ij' and the difference with 'ei'.

On this same website also the pronunciation of Dutch vowels (a, oo, ui, au, ..):
http://www.learndutch.rozemarijnonline. ... ation.html

You can also watch these Dutch lessons on YouTube itself:
https://www.youtube.com/user/DutchWithRozemarijn/videos

Nice videos, I can recommend them.

Post Reply