Please and thanks and all that polite stuff ;)

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How do you say daddy-long-legs in Dutch? How many ways are there to say "thank you" or "you're welcome"? Post everything about vocabulary here.

Please and thanks and all that polite stuff ;)

Postby EetSmakelijk » Tue Oct 11, 2005 2:55 am

Hallo.
I find that I am often saying please and thank you to people on this forum and I like to say it in het Nederlands. :grin:
I know dank je or jullie wel, and that's about it!
I do not know how to say please, so please tell me. :lol:
Also, is there more than one way to say please and thanks?
I do not want my politeness to become tiresome, and sometimes I need different levels of it like thanks a million, thanks a bunch, thanks so much, etc.
Are there formal and informal ways of thanking or saying please?
Another topic I am interested in is greetings and goodbyes. I would like to learn the various ways of saying hallo and tot ziens.
:grin:
I know there must be more ways and probably some very formal ones and some you would use for friends and family.
Please help, and thanks very much because this is really an important topic!
With polite groetjes,
ES, S'je, Saartje, of EetSmakelijk
:P
Mijn Esnips account is:
http://www.esnips.com/web/EetSmakelijksDutchStuff
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Some hello - goodbye expressions

Postby Tom » Tue Oct 11, 2005 3:22 am

Hoi Eet Smakelijk,

Here are a few in no particular order:

Doei– bye-bye, cheers
Welterusten – good nite, nighty-night, sleep well
Trusten – same as above. I often see this abbreviation in chat rooms.
Tot straks – so long, see you later
Tot volgende week – till next week
Tot de volgende keer – till next time
Toedeloe – toodle-oo
Toedels – same as above, another chat room thing, but sometimes my teachers say it too at the end of class.
Vaarwel – goodbye, farewell
Adieu – goodbye
Tot ziens – see you, goodbye
Slaap lekker – sleep well


Hallo – hello
Hoi – hello, hi, howdy
Goedendag, goeiendag – good day
Goedemorgen – good morning
Goedenacht – good night
Goedemiddag – good afternoon


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Postby Marco » Tue Oct 11, 2005 12:29 pm

Alright, here we go:

please:
polite / formal: alstublieft (formed from 'als het u blieft')
informal: alsjeblieft (formed from 'als het jou blieft')

thank you:
polite / formal: dank u (wel)
informal: dank je (wel) (I always write 'dankjewel' as one piece, I don't know if that's correct, actually! :oops: )

you're welcome:
graag gedaan!
geen dank!

To get back to toedeloe / toedels:
here (in the eastern part) we also say: toedeloedokie! (toodle-oodohkey)

hoi --> 'hai' is also used.

doei or doeg (I prefer 'doei')
Dag! - Bye!

There are probably some/a lot more, but it's lacking of inspiration right now!
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Thank you

Postby Laura » Tue Oct 11, 2005 4:40 pm

I have a question about saying thank you, I hope I'm posting it in vaguely the right place.

What is there to say for those occasions when "dank je wel" isn't quite enough?

I mean something along the lines of "thank you for all your help and encouragement, I really appreciate it".

With unnecessarily wordy thank yous,
LJ

Edit by Bieneke: I merged your topic with EetSmakelijk's.
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Postby LaPingvino » Tue Oct 11, 2005 7:22 pm

Especially between younger people it's quite usual to use the English word "Thanks"... (In informal email a letter most times is finished with tnx...).
Ik ben een Nederlandse Esperantist, heb een aardig taalgevoel en kan vaak dingen goed uitleggen, hoewel ik natuurlijk ook niet perfect ben...
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Postby Marco » Wed Oct 12, 2005 7:07 am

And how could I forget these ones:

Môge! (= Morgen!) - Morning!

Uiju! (Ui-ju) - Bye!
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Postby Laura » Wed Oct 12, 2005 8:55 am

And also, how would I greet someone who's just returned from a trip? I'd say "Welcome back" in English and I have learnt from setting my e-mail to Nederlands that "welcome" = "welkom" and "back" = "terug" (it tells me "terug naar Postvak IN"), but would you ever say "Welkom terug"?
Literal translations are a bit perilous....

Dank jullie wel,
LJ
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Postby Bieneke » Wed Oct 12, 2005 1:58 pm

Hi Laura,

You must have some kind of a telepathic connection with EetSmakelijk as she posted the same question at the same time in another topic: http://www.dutchgrammar.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=153 8)

Groetjes,
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Postby Laura » Wed Oct 12, 2005 2:43 pm

Brilliant, thank you Bieneke and everyone who answered Eet Smakelijk's query. I feel a bit lost without at least 20 different ways to say please and thank you.

But is there a fancier way to say thank you (like a translation of the sentence in my first post) - a sentence's worth of humble thanks?
Also, could you tell me what "welcome back" is in Dutch?

Dank jullie wel,
LJ
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Postby Bieneke » Wed Oct 12, 2005 3:00 pm

"thank you for all your help and encouragement, I really appreciate it".

Literally: "Bedankt voor al je hulp en aanmoedigingen, ik waardeer het zeer". 'Aanmoediging' is a literal translation of 'encouragement', perhaps there is a better (but less literal) translation for it but I cannot think of one right now.

"Welcome back" = "Welkom terug"

Doei
Houdoe
Ajuu
Groetjes,
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Postby Laura » Thu Oct 20, 2005 5:30 pm

Possibly I should have started a new topic, but I think this question won't take long to answer and it's on the theme of politeness.

How do you start a letter in Dutch, the equivalent of the English "Dear [person's name]"?

Dank jullie wel,
LJ
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Postby Wim » Thu Oct 20, 2005 6:28 pm

Hallo Laura,

In a formal letter (e.g. a business letter or a letter to a person you don't know [well]) there's in fact only one salutation possible, which is Geachte heer of Geachte mevrouw followed by the person's surname only (i.e. no first names or letters) and followed by a comma. Titles are no longer usual either. After an extra space between the lines the text of the actual letter should start with a capital. If you don't know the name of the person you're writing to you can use Geachte mevrouw, mijnheer,. I prefer to put mevrouw in the first place, as (despite all wanted social equality between men and women) usually a lady will be the first one to read a letter in an office.

Examples:

Geachte heer De Wit, (note the two capitals)
Geachte mevrouw Johansen,
Geachte heer, mevrouw,
Geachte bewoners, (e.g. when writing to residents of a certain building or part of town).

The use of capitals in names containing words like van or de and the like is different in the Netherlands and Belgium. In the Netherlands those words do not have a capital if the first name or first letters are mentioned. Only if they are the first word of the name without anything before it (such as in the start of a letter) the first word of the name will have a capital letter. In Belgium the first letter of a surname will always have a capital, no matter if there's a first name or letters before it.

So when witing a letter to Peter van der Horst in the address you should mention De heer P. van der Horst and ifor salutation in the letter Geachte heer Van der Horst, but in Belgium the same Peter would be called Peter Van der Horst. The start of a Belgian letter will be the same as in the Netherlands.

For informal letters we have many more possibilities and they usually only contain first names:

Beste Peter,
Beste collega's, (Dear colleagues,)
Lieve Laura,
Lieve oom Peter, (Dear uncle Peter,)
Liefste (may be followed by a name), (Dearest ...)
Hallo John,
Hoi John,

etcetera. Lieve is especially for those with whom you have a really close relationship, be it erotical or not.

I could wite you a similar lecture about closing a letter, but I think this would do for now.

Groetjes,
Wim
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Postby Laura » Fri Oct 21, 2005 8:55 am

Bedankt Wim, these social conventions are always more complicated than I think they are going to be! I'm not on very formal terms with anyone Dutch, but I will bare this in mind should I ever become so.

Please can I have the lecture about closing a letter too? Or at least some kind of friendly "best regards" type of thing, I'm not so likely to use the equivalent of "Yours sincerely".

Groetjes,
LJ
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Postby Wim » Fri Oct 21, 2005 3:51 pm

Hoi Laura,

I'm glad to hear that you're not the kind of person for very formal terms (at least not in Dutch). Are there any biologists who are? Not many, I suppose :) .

Yesterday I ran out of time so I had to stop writing. If I give you some translations and examples I think you'll get the point.

Formal letters:
Hoogachtend, (note the comma - Yours sincerely, Yours faithfully), and a little less formal
Met vriendelijke groeten, or
Met vriendelijke groet, (With kind regards).

In really informal situations (the people you address by their first names)there are many more possibilities again, which may vary according to the situation. Your imagination won't fool you. Some examples:

Met vriendelijke groeten, (too!)
Met hartelijke groeten, (With kind(est) regards; Best regards)
Groeten, (Greetings)
Groetjes, (Warm greetings)
Saluut, (See you!)
Tot ziens, (See you later)
Tot morgen, (See you tomorrow)
Tot volgende week, (See you next week, ... or whenever)

Liefs, (Love)
Kusjes, (Lots of love (and kisses))

Sterkte, (Take care, Take heart)
Hou je taai, (Take care of yourself, Never say die)

Groetjes,
Wim

PS
In a different post I saw you worked as a botanist in London. I know London is big, but yet I'm curious to know if you're working at (in?) Kew Gardens. They're so special and world famous!
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Postby Laura » Fri Oct 21, 2005 4:55 pm

Hoi Wim,
Dank je wel! I think I now know enough to be able to at least address people properly in Dutch when I write to them.
Yes, I think I should have said "I'm not on very formal terms with anyone (full stop)". Biologists are a scruffy, informal lot in my experience, which is possibly one of the reasons I like being one!

Groetjes,
LJ
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